20

Quarantine was always a standard procedure for the astronauts which landed on the Moon. The Apollo astronauts were kept in quarantine just in case they contracted something on the Moon's surface. This turned out to be unnecessary, but better safe than sorry. But how likely is it that there are deadly pathogens on another planet? I would say it is pretty ...


18

No, not really. The atmosphere of Mars is very thin. It has below 1% of the pressure on Earth. That means it has less than 1% of the force of wind on Earth with the same speed. Wind only occures at dawn or dusk. Wind happens when there is a pressure gradient between two areas of an atmosphere. Pressure gradients are caused by temparature- and humidity ...


14

The biggest thing that Mars One has accomplished is getting people to think about going to Mars. That's actually a difficult process, and so far their efforts have done much towards changing the perspective of people in thinking that way. People talk about Mars One in a way that going to Mars hasn't been talked about much. SpaceX, while it isn't a secret at ...


10

The cooperation between Mars One and SpaceX will become serious after they sign a binding contract of some sort. Until this is the case, their relationship will be very loose and will not force any party to do anything by any date. So far there is no such contract signed between the 2 parties. Basically, SpaceX won't be doing anything, until Mars One makes ...


9

IANAL (I Am Not A Lawyer), and this is an unqualified opinion alone, not a legal advice, but I'd say no, since there's no proven intent to harm oneself, so it couldn't be interpreted under section 309. I asked a related question here if any government has issued an official recommendation regarding Mars One application, but sadly it didn't yet result in any ...


8

Directly from the Mars One site - Finance and Feasibility, Mission Cost: After discussions with potential suppliers for each component and close examination, Mars One estimates the cost of putting the first four people on Mars at six billion US Dollar. The six billion figure is the cost of all the hardware combined, plus the operational ...


8

You should quickly find sources converge on a coefficient to convert dose into cancers. Modern science has quantified this rather well. http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Linear_no-threshold LNT estimates that the risk of premature death from radiation-induced cancer is around 5% per sievert or 0.5% per 100 mSv of exposure. The units are easy to mess up, so ...


8

It's not that wind is not viable, it's just that it's less viable than other sources of energy. With such a small part of Earth atmosphere pressure, even the high wind speeds it's insufficient. Energy scales linearly with pressure but with square of wind speed; for wind turbines on Earth the optimal wind speed is 50km/h; 200km/h of Mars would increase the ...


7

Yes, to an extent. A few key facts: While the atmosphere has 1% of the pressure of Earth's, it consists primarily of carbon dioxide (MW = 44) much more than nitrogen (MW = 28). Thus the effective wind pressure at a given speed is closer to 2% of Earth's. Wind power increases with the square of the wind speed which can be higher then that of Earth. This has ...


7

I don't know how the legal system of India officially defines "suicide", but usually suicide is considered an act with the sole intention to end ones life. While Mars One is definitely not a risk-free endeavour, the people who partake in it do not have the intention to die. They expect to survive the trip and then spend the rest of their life on Mars. ...


6

There is an official Mars One FAQ page answering exactly this question: Mars One will take specific steps to ensure that the Mars environment (which we will study, and on which we will depend) will not be harmed. The Mars base will be forced to recycle just about everything, and pay close attention to its energy use and minimize the leakage of ...


6

Let's first get a few boring details out of the way, then we'll see if we need to tell Santa to add a detour to Mars to his 2025 schedule. There won't be any children on Mars by 2025 with the minimum applicant age requirement of 18 years by end of August 2013, deadline for Mars One online application program: The astronaut selection program will be open ...


6

There's no need to worry about any viruses from Mars. If there are any, there would also have to be host organisms through which these viruses would multiply and survive (it's still debatable whether viruses even count as life). And host organisms are easier to detect through e.g. their metabolic process byproducts, and also more difficult to contaminate ...


6

Yes, this was released in mid-October 2014 by a group of Ph.D. candidates at MIT: http://web.mit.edu/sydneydo/Public/Mars%20One%20Feasibility%20Analysis%20IAC14.pdf And they will be interviewed and available for listeners' questions today November 25th at thespaceshow.com Listen live 10-11:30 PM EST Generally speaking, the report is quite pessimistic, ...


6

From the Mars One Website: According to the Mars One roadmap, a demonstration mission carrying proof of concept for some of the technologies and a communication satellite would be launched in January 2016. The communication satellite would arrive in orbit in October 2016 and would be able to relay images and videos from the surface of the Red ...


5

While the rover is an automated vehicle, it is likely it can be used in a personnel transport role. Any vehicle that can carry a person's suited mass, and has a platform big enough to sit upon, and doesn't exceed about 3G's of thrust is a suitable personnel transport. It may not be ideal, it may not be comfortable, but it doesn't need to be. The Mars One ...


5

To fully answer your question requires giving you an enormous amount of background information. The best explanation I have seen of this for the layman is astronaut Dr. Stan Love's presentation on why it is hard to go to Mars. Watch, be entertained, and learn. Some highlights (these are not my points, they are his, so it is fruitless to argue them with me)...


5

They need one, but they don't admit it... In general, most long term space habitats are expected to engage in water recycling. NASA has always done so. They Claim The Mars One site, however, indicates that they will not be recylcing. In their own words: It will carry close to 800 kg of dry food, 3000 liters of water and 700 kg of oxygen on board. No ...


4

Yes, it would be, of course. I'm not sure why you'd need a superconductor for that though, when a lot simpler technologies such as piezoelectric, electrostatic, sonic (basically a "subwoofer"), compressed air, or other types of mechanical drives could be used. Also, simple rotation of solar panels should help too, and let the gravity do the rest, if that's ...


4

Once you open the hatch, Mars is contaminated. No matter how hard you try to sterilize everything before opening up, there will be microbes on the outside of suits, airlock surfaces, etc. Maybe you could flood the airlock with hot acid or some other biocide and then drain it, but that will be considered too much useless payload, and is not 100% guaranteed ...


3

Partial answer, it would be much harder than on Earth. GIF: A windy day on Mars, remember that Mars' gravity is less than Earth's so the wind isn't as strong as it might appear. Archived from the Telltale Procjet at Mars Simulation Laboratory: https://web.archive.org/web/20120220080017/http://www.marslab.dk/TelltaleProject.html Borrowed from (currently ...


3

First, no that's not the reason it is one way, though it is something that is a matter of concern that has to be thought about. It's for reasons of cost and technology. Mars is a much harder place to land on and take off from than the Moon. That's because of the rocket equation The delta v to escape from Mars to orbit is 4.1 km / sec. To escape from the ...


3

I would say that any endeavor which has no precedent cannot be legally shown to either result or not result in a given conclusion. For example, if you choose to drink a glass full of an unknown liquid and there is no known previous attempt by anyone to drink it before you, then it cannot be said with total certainty that you will die or not die as a result ...


3

Mars One's Mission Roadmap on their website states that the first crews living quarters arrive, 26 months later the first crew arrives, a few weeks later the second crew living quarters arrive, 26 months later the second crew arrive, and on and on as additional living quarters and crews continue to arrive. Also eventually martian colonists will start having ...


2

Current proposed manned Mars mission plans are very diverse and which plan you chose would affect whether to include a return trip. Let's weigh some pros and cons: Pros (no return trip) Save on fuel transport costs OR Don't require ISRU fuel factory Spaceships used once and can be constructed cheaper Cons (no return trip) No sample return means heavy lab ...


2

TLDR: No, once Mars is inhabited, it should remain inhabited forever. First, the current answer is that the mission has already ended, since the Mars One organization has failed to produce a feasible plan to raise funds for a believable process to get there. Second, no, Mars One had a plan which included sending four additional astronauts arriving every 26 ...


1

Mars One's schedule, budget, business idea (live TV reality show from Mars?) and some of their technical proposals are unworkable. But they have been extremely effective in marketing! They have indeed already created popular support for missions to Mars. If they focus on their (Earthbound) marketing skills, they might in that respect very well become a part ...


1

The Mars rovers do not have any dust removing technology. And Opportunity worked fine for 10 years, so the dust problem should not be exaggerated. It is worse on the Moon (and on any asteroid) where there's no atmosphere which has eroded the dust. The regolith on the Moon is very fine, sharp as glass and sticky because of its electrostatic charge. The Apollo ...


1

As a matter of fact, people who will land on Mars are not necessarily destined to death, as they will regularly be restocked with supplies from Earth (refer to mars one article in wikipedia). The only element that would not occur would be their return to Earth, because of the lack of its feasibility. Then, morally, the qualified Mars astronauts are not ...


1

As difficult to answer as this question is (how can one know that a government hasn't and just not publicised it well?) here's a good first step in looking for the answer. http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=link%3Awww.mars-one.com+inurl%3A.gov&oq=link%3Awww.mars-one.com+inurl%3A.gov That google search looks for any webpage that has .gov in it's url that ...


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