New answers tagged

3

The meteorite is part of the SuperCam Calibration Target (SCCT) on Perseverance. From the paper "SuperCam Calibration Targets: Design and Development": As a nod to the notion of return samples that this mission prefigures, and for outreach purposes, we have installed a ∼11×9×1.25 mm slab from a Martian meteorite (ref. North West Africa, NWA 10170) ...


15

NASA plans multiple translational correction maneuvers for their spacecraft headed toward another planet. The intent of these correction maneuvers is to bring the spacecraft back on track so as to reach the intended target. NASA has become very proud of the fact that the last few correction maneuvers have been waived off; the corrections in the early ...


-4

From an "agricultural" (i.e. using words that even I can understand) point of view: I'm a long-time long-distance motorcyclist. People ask me why I check my tire pressures so often during a long trip. Here's how I explain that: "Let's say I top off my tires in western CO, up to their recommended pressures. A few days later, I find myself in ...


10

Absolutely not. Besides the minor issue that the shuttle is retired and no longer flyable, its aerodynamic performance during the descent and landing phase is dependent on the density of Earth's atmosphere. Mars' atmosphere is about 1/100 as dense, so the shuttle won't have the lift or controllability that it needs to land.


1

The heat of formation of iron oxide from the elements is approximately -825kJ/mol, with each mole being about 160 g of iron (III) oxide. https://janaf.nist.gov/tables/Fe-030.html 2 Fe + 3/2 O2 -> Fe2O3 So the reverse reaction produces 1.5 moles of oxygen gas from 160g of iron oxide, which is about 48g of oxygen. Any process that takes iron oxide and ...


3

Talus is also referred to as scree, which is, a collection of broken rock fragments at the base of crags, mountain cliffs, volcanoes or valley shoulders that has accumulated through periodic rockfall from adjacent cliff faces. Landforms associated with these materials are often called talus deposits. Such deposits are formed as a result of, physical and ...


0

Modern radar and similar sensors are more than good enough to identify flat landing spots (old lake beds, lava flows, wind-scoured plains, etc.) from orbit. I don't know if we currently have such sensors around Mars - we have some orbiters that are attempting to survey the planet, but perhaps not in such detail as could support finding a landing site - but ...


1

Ignoring the issue of getting specific alloys, as that is a hard question common to all answers so far given, and outside my knowledge... What you want to use is this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/FFC_Cambridge_process Electrolyse the iron oxide ore on a liquid salt bath. Advantages of lower working temperatures than a smelter (900c Vs 1200c), no need to ...


2

As other answers here have noted, simply splitting the oxygen from the iron doesn't produce USABLE iron - for that, you need carbon content. I'm sure there are other workable approaches to this, but here's one: To get elemental iron: Produce water from Martian wells Split the water with Hydrolysis, and capture the H2. Mine Martian regolith and tumble ...


1

No known planet besides Earth has both oxygen and fossil fuels for energy, and so Mars will need either something on the order of electrical solar cells or nuclear for energy. If you are talking nuclear, you will need to find viable uranium and thorium ores, use some sort of energy reserves to purify it, and then that could be the starting point for more ...


2

The Wikipedia article 'Atmosphere of Mars' lists the nitrogen fraction of the atmosphere of Mars as 2.6%. It is possible then that nitrogen could be obtained from the atmosphere using a compressor, with other components like the CO2 removed. The Wikipedia article on Cabin pressurization; Spacecraft indicates that the U.S. Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs ...


1

Martian atmosphere can be collected by good compressors. Such a compressor is centuries old technology and is very cheap. After that, nitrogen can be extracted by fractional distillation, roughly as we do it on the Earth (cooling will make $CO_2$ quickly solidify, rest effort will be spent to separate it from the $O_2$ part). This all does not require any ...


2

Two satellites is never enough. In the picture below two satellites can cover the surfaces of Mars between the pairs of tangent lines enveloping each satellite, but a belt (shown in blue cutting through Mars) is left uncovered because it is outside the region between the pairs of tangents. On Mars or any other round body, you always need at least three ...


-2

If you are just going to Mars it will not make sense to have a waystation. At a point when there is regular travel to Mars and beyond it could be useful to have 3 multi purpose stations at 1.25 AU. They could also function as science and astronomy labs. They could be manufacturing hubs for mined asteroid materials. Both Mars and Earth would use them as ...


2

Yes. I really wanted to just answer that one word, but it does not quite allow it. The good news is that the problem they encountered in the SN8 static fire led them to armour some lines that they thought were vulnerable, sooner than expected. This also suggests that the engines themselves may not be too vulnerable, rather it is the control lines (electric, ...


6

Yes, it is possible. Radius of Earth:$6,378 \mathrm{km}$ Radius of the Moon: $1,737\mathrm{km}$ Semimajor Axis of the Moon's orbit: $384,000 \mathrm{km}$ Minimum distance from Earth to Mars: $54,600,000 \mathrm{km}$ Since the maximum difference in distance between the Earth and the moon is roughly 0.7% the minimum distance between Earth and Mars, you can ...


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