13

The new test stand is for the full Falcon Heavy. Every Merlin is tested on the stand before being combined into a full F9 stage. It is reasonable to extrapolate this out to the three core FHeavy. The benefits of a 3 core test are unclear. The Falcon Heavy was planned to have cross feed capability, where fuel would flow from the two external boosters to the ...


7

I agree with the other answer that this will not happen. I think the causes vary slightly, though -- The legs are an oft-repeated bit of fan speculation. We have a few real world examples of openings in heat shields, though, that don't indicate any particular problems. Shuttle had multiple openings, and while it had heat shield problems none were related ...


6

In a NASA TV Press conference, before the first pad abort, Hans Konnigsman noted that the pad abort will not be using a full rocket underneath it. (Makes sense, why potentially damage a $50 million vehicle that is not really needed). He also said that they would not be using the full Transport Erector either. Thus these parts looks like they may be the ...


5

Sorry for the necropost, but this showed up in a Google search for something else. This is a LOX "dunk tank" used for COPV testing at cryogenic temps. It was destroyed in testing to confirm COPV explosion theories after the AMOS6 incident. ADDED:


5

Like any good descent engine, SuperDraco throttles deeply; Wikipedia says down to 20%. Various speculative sources put the thrust angle anywhere between 25º and 35º, which determines cosine losses. The sidewall angle is 15º, and the thrust angle is greater than that. Split the difference and assume it's 30º for 0.87 cosine. I can't find a solid reference ...


3

Looks like now it has been answered (though not officially), but here's a video from SpaceX with JCSAT-14 booster test. In this video, you can clearly see the test stand and you also can see it looks like also designed with three core Falcon Heavy.


3

Probably never. NASA was not comfortable with the idea of legs that went through holes in the heat shield, and thus SpaceX reverted to water landings for Dragon Crew vehicles. Once that choice was made, and with BFR on the horizon, they decided not to spend the money on developing a feature for which they had no paying customers. This also meant the Red ...


1

Think of it like this: how would you test the vehicle without a crane? They are testing out the powered landing capabilities so the idea is to work with slow, smooth trajectories that may be mostly vertical but will obviously incorporate some lateral movement too. If anything were to go wrong the vehicle could diverge wildly off-course and probably ...


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