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129

I believe it was John Young, during an Apollo 16 EVA fell to the lunar surface. Though awkward, he got up unassisted by attempting a series of what looks like push-ups until he was able to get himself to his knees. Then he had little difficulty standing up from resting on his knees. This YouTube clip shows how he did it. Apollo 16 astronaut falls and ...


77

Objects in orbit are attracted to each other, it's just their mass is small enough that the force of gravity between them is infinitesimal. Gravitational acceleration is dependent on mass and distance. In a scenario where a 150 kg astronaut is 10 m from a 80,000 kg Space Shuttle, the astronaut would be pulled toward the Shuttle at 5.336e-8 m/second squared. ...


68

The biggest give away is the size of this chamber: its too big for any of the known NASA's KC-135 or ZG's 727-200. That leaves us one other candidate: their Russian counterpart IL-76 MDK The interior, roof, lights, and door in the back ground is pretty much identical. (source: zeroflight.org)


57

As always, the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal is a treasure trove of annotated examples. During the later (J) missions in particular, Ed Fendell, remotely operating the rover's TV camera, managed to capture a few for posterity. Falling forward (straight or a bit to one side) happened to several moon walkers, and getting up was not that difficult. Only Charlie ...


56

They can and they do use regular ballpoint pens. And normal pencils, mechanical pencils, grease pencils, felt-tip markers ("Sharpies"), and pressurized "space pens". ESA astronaut Pedro Duque comments on ballpoint pens in his 2003 diary. I am writing these notes in the Soyuz with a cheap ballpoint pen. Why is that important? As it ...


54

The reason the Space Station is called a micro-g environment rather than a zero g environment is because the Space Station is rotating, because it's in low Earth orbit, and because it's big (for a spacecraft). The Space Station nominally rotates at the orbital rate so as to keep the nadir-pointing windows pointing downward. This alone means an accelerometer ...


39

No. Saturn's moon Mimas is the smallest body in the solar system known to be rounded through self-gravitation, and it still has a surface escape velocity of 159 m/s, far above the speed achievable by the best human athletes.


36

This description of the Apollo 7 mission from NASA contains a more detailed description: Mucus accumulates, fills the nasal passages and does not drain from the head. The only relief is to blow hard, which is painful to the ear drums. So the crew of Apollo 7 whirled through space suffering from stopped-up ears and noses. They took aspirin and decongestant ...


32

Despite Charlie Duke's concern about it, given that the PLSS is massive, and would shift an astronaut's center of gravity far back from their natural distribution, it would be surprising if the designers hadn't anticipated the possibility of a fall. This view of the PLSS shows that the back side of the backpack is almost a single unbroken shell: ...


28

Although this has indeed "worked to bits" on the Physics and other SE sites it's worth looking at, for the sake of Space Exploration, the interesting history behind the analysis of the falling cat. For the fully rigorous description of the cat's righting reflex - perfectly in keeping with conservation of angular momentum - only came about because it was ...


28

This is exactly how it works and how the orientation of many satellites is controlled. For example, the Hubble telescope has 4 fidget spinners installed, pointing in different directions - although they are commonly referred to as "reaction wheels". Unfortunately a typical fidget spinner is a bit too light to be really useful: We have to compare ...


27

A haircut is done with an electric trimmer which has a vacuum hose attached. Wet shaving avoids this by trapping the cuttings in shaving foam, but some astronauts use electric razors, again with a vacuum hose. Here's a video of someone using an electric trimmer: Shaving in space


27

In a ideal / non real world / perfect circular orbit situation, they wouldn't lose altitude. They're falling but missing the planet due to their "sideways" velocity. In the real world aerodynamic drag and other factors cause them to lose speed and therefore altitude. The animations at this wikipedia page explaining Newton's Mountain Cannon thought ...


26

This video published on YouTube on Zero-G: "Movement in Microgravity: Skylab to Space Shuttle" 1988 NASA Weightlessness Footage, starting at 2:10 into it, shows a Skylab astronaut doing a front roll and a spiral roll in the Skylab Orbital Workshop without touching anything to push against to change his orientation. And the same video from 5:45 to 6:00 shows ...


26

According to Robert Frost, Flight Controller at NASA: The onboard iPads are configured with the mute switch acting as the rotation lock. Should a crew member want to change the screen orientation, they toggle the mute switch and then jerk the iPad to impart a force that will change the orientation. They then reactivate the rotation lock. So not ...


26

The two most commonly used techniques for humans are neutral buoyancy and parabolic flights. Neutral Buyoancy Neutral buoyancy simulates the weightless environment of space. First equipment is lowered into the pool using an overhead crane. Suited astronauts then get in the tank and support divers add weight to the astronauts so that they experience no ...


26

When you have gravity heavy particulates like shavings, crumbs, large dust granules, etc. will fall to the ground where they can be cleaned or form part of the environment. In microgravity everything is suspended no matter the size, so there is a lot more stuff to deal with, including dust. Heavier particles take more energy to move, so they will take longer ...


25

Those are the Ascent Checklist and the Ascent/Entry Systems Procedures (AESP) book. These are used by the back-seater Mission Specialists (MSs) and contain copies of the cue cards and flip-books used by the front-seater commander and pilot. The MSs follow along in the checklists and back up the front seaters. The Ascent Checklist contains the nominal and ...


24

The cake will "rise" for the same reasons it does in gravity (yeast or other agents releasing gases as a metabolic byproduct, when heated, or as a chemical process and reacting to other ingredients, given sufficient time and providing for other required conditions to activate the rising agent). The only problem is, it will "rise" equally in all directions in ...


24

I found a real world test of this. Dan Barry tried it when STS-96 was docked to the ISS. I've scanned his account from the book "Space Shuttle: the first 20 years." tl;dr - he escaped by throwing his clothes. Transcription: DAN BARRY | Stranded in the middle of the room STS-96 Entering the space station from the orbiter for the first time in ...


22

Would a higher air pressure on the ISS or elsewhere make it easier to “swim” in microgravity? Yes! But what's really important is the density, so instead of pressuring "normal air" you can just make a denser atmospheric mixture and keep the pressure the same. This answer says If you want the air to be 5 times easier to swim, you can just replace ...


21

Nice observation, he is just doing it to show off! Check these out: https://twitter.com/cmdr_hadfield/status/326727757109268481?lang=en


19

What if you just carried a couple of uninflated balloons with you? If you ever get stuck, just inflate the balloon, and then hold it near your center of mass, aim it away from you, and let the air out. Repeat until you make it to the wall. The nice thing is that an uninflated balloon is light enough that you could even have a couple of spares.


19

Like many dehydrated space foods, it's prepared by injecting hot water through a port in an otherwise sealed bag, manually mixing it by massaging the bag, and waiting a few minutes; the noodles are thinner than typical instant noodles so that moderately hot (instead of boiling) water can soften them. As for eating it without spilling, the secret seems to be ...


19

As Organic Marble points out, yes the US space program had G meters. They're likely to include these in future manned missions, as well. As for the true purpose of the toys: To humans, any sudden reduction in acceleration feels like falling. When the engines cut off, they are aware that there is less thrust, but the human body isn't great at telling you, ...


18

Problem with what you propose, a kind of harpoon with probably a soft-tipped and magnetic head tethered projectile so it doesn't damage / penetrate the station's hull yet still holds onto it once it would reach it, is that the shooting of a kinetic projectile in one direction would propel you with equal force in the opposite direction since there's nothing ...


18

Consider this equation for gravitational attraction between two bodies: $$F = G \frac{m_1 m_2}{r^2}$$ where: $F$ is the force between the masses; $G$ is the gravitational constant (6.674×10−11 N · (m/kg)2); $m1$ is the first mass; $m2$ is the second mass; $r$ is the distance between the centers of the masses. So if we say that an ...


18

It's an Epson Stylus Color 800 - a pretty standard inkjet printer (a laser printer would be a nightmare - all that fine toner dust!) Here's an example of an Earthly one from a 1998 page of the Washington Apple Pi Journal: The ink cartridges don't care about gravity - they work by capillary attraction from a storage sponge in the cartridge, and then ...


17

So far the studies that have been performed in orbit have shown that plants grow perfectly normal (shoots up, roots down--so to speak) in microgravity. They also produce healthy offspring which can grow new plants in orbit. Experiments have been performed on Arabidopsis and other Brassicaceae. Aboard the ISS a special “plant growth chamber” called Advanced ...


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