Hot answers tagged

26

Most such spacecraft, including Skylab and the ISS, have their attitude maintained by reaction wheels. These wheel essentially convert the rotational energy of the entire spacecraft into a smaller reaction wheel. If the attitude failed while these wheels were spun up, then they would eventually slow down (In a timeframe of minutes). As the wheels slowed down,...


25

Looking at old manifest documents, it seems pretty clear that Atlantis (OV-104) was outfitted with all the hardware for Shuttle-Mir missions and they used her exclusively for that until they couldn't any more. The rules for orbiter mission scheduling were really byzantine but one major consideration was that every X flights and/or time interval, the ...


15

Columbia did not. Despite being in service during the Shuttle-Mir and International Space Station programs, Columbia did not fly any missions that visited a space station. The other three active orbiters at the time had visited both Mir and the ISS at least once. Columbia was not well-suited for high-inclination missions; it was the heaviest of the orbiters, ...


13

437 days in a single stretch. The mammal was a relatively standard specimen of Homo sapiens sapiens. Known affectionately as Valeri Polyakov by his handlers, the subject was launched to orbit on-board Soyuz TM-6 on August 29, 1988. The mammalian subject was allowed free movement in a spacious 350 cubic meter enclosure, provided with a diet consisting of ...


13

A couple from personal experience: If the station has several identical or nearly-identical components externally, label them with labels big enough to be seen from windows. The US segment of the space station contains eight massive solar arrays. When looking at imagery of them, it is often quite difficult to discern exactly which piece of hardware I'm ...


11

Martin's answer offers a great overview and a link to a hidden gem - transcribed interview with Michael Foale, covering the incident and its aftermath in a great detail. I'd like to share the most interesting bits here as an answer for reference. The whole transcript is a very very interesting and chilling reading, what follows are some terse excerpts (so ...


11

Yes, this was done during the EO-21 mission via a spacewalk from Mir in May 1996. The deployment was filmed (or videotaped) for use in a TV commercial. The balloon was not intended to be visible directly from the surface of the Earth. Additional info here.


11

It doesn't have to be an external torque, consider for example the crew changing position inside the space station, although the maximal torque provided by moving the entire crew to the Kvant-1 is only going to change the rotation rate by 0.15%. Note: This is not violating the conservation of momentum, as they are simply changing the centre of mass in an ...


10

I am not aware of any structural dynamics tests conducted on the ISS using crewmembers as 'excitation sources'. However, the ISS does have a build-in structural dynamics sensor system consisting of accelerometers and strain gauges. This paper describes some early tests where a laser imaging system was also used. Jet firings and spacecraft dockings ...


9

EVA's have turned out to be an impractical way to work in space. Service robots are taking over even on the crewed ISS. Many of the different health problems with microgravity have been discovered in much greater detail. It could be a profound takeaway if it means that the next space station will have to be designed with rotating so called artificial ...


9

Possible lessons: Resupply is hard. It takes a lot of time to load/unload cargo. Automated docking is better than manual berthing. Big doors are good for moving big cargo.


9

For the US space program, it started in Skylab. Vacuuming of the Orbital Workshop mixing chamber screen, the waste management compartment screen, and other environmental control system screens was performed on an as-needed basis, usually about every other day. Screens with large mesh did not require vacuuming since most of the debris passed through them. ...


8

Here is the list of people (11) I have found so far: 14-Mar-1995 Norman Thagard, Soyuz TM-21, Mir, STS-71 Gennady Strekalov, Soyuz TM-21, Mir, STS-71 Vladimir Dezhurov, Soyuz TM-21, Mir, STS-71 27-Jun-1995: Anatoly Solovyev, STS-71, Mir, Soyuz TM-21 Nikolai Budarin, STS-71, Mir, Soyuz TM-21 31-Oct-2000 ...


8

The best I was able to find is this description of the event by Michael Foale. In short reactive thrusters of the docked Soyuz spacecraft was used to reorient the whole station. And, in the periods of time when onboard system had temporally enough energy to maintain at least radio link with ground control center, MIR thrusters (commanded from the ground) ...


8

CelesTrack has Mir ephemerides (as TLE, two-line element sets) in its NORAD Two-Line Element Sets Historical Archives. It's a 755 KB in size ZIP archive (direct link) packing a text file with 22,333 TLE spanning time period from February 19, 1986 to March 23, 2001 when it was deorbited. If these don't go far enough back in time for your needs, you can ...


8

The Kristall (crystal) module of Mir carried a number of payloads for carrying out metallurgy and crystal growth experiments and was dubbed a factory in Soviet Press, as it was supposed to manufacture semiconductor samples for Soviet industries. The instruments abroad Kristall included, Krater-V electrical furnace- for producing perfect gallium arsenide and ...


7

Long term international cooperation is hard And it might not come with only advantages, such as share the assembly and operational costs, share science, technology, infrastructure, services, increase IP portfolio and so on. Some disadvantages are apparent since the Crimea crisis and US/EU sanctions against Russia, when momentarily, even the immediate future ...


7

First off, here's a picture (source: NASA) of the inside of the MIR node with something connected in every direction: There's also a video here where the node is traversed, but I can't find any pictures from before all the ports were occupied. It's not particularly spacious, but in the picture only one cone-shaped drogue hatch cover is clearly visible, as ...


6

I think I found the answer. No. Because the Lyappa arm, was not attached to the Mir node, rather the docking node had a connection point, that the modules launched with a Lyappa arm, could latch onto to rotate themeselves. Thus since Soyuz did not launch with such an arm attached it could not be moved to a side port. This is because I am interested in ...


6

All these craft were designed to maintain the rough equivalent of a sea level atmosphere. Reference: Life Support Concepts for Space Travel Shuttle Environmental Control and Life Support System Mission Control Center screenshot from STS-88 Reference: Personal notes Reference: Fundamentals of Aerospace Medicine The Soyuz space ship uses an atmosphere ...


5

The major claimed advantage of the APAS was that it can be applied to more massive vehicles because it incorporates a damping system. Buran was going to be much more massive than Soyuz. Source: United We Orbit


4

Many more smaller launchers means smaller modules. That is a limit on absolute volume limits. Inflatables are a way to handle this. Launch them folded, expand in space, in a later launch deliver water that is stored in the walls as additional radiation shielding. So smaller launch, additional launches for outfitting. Volume is not always a limit though. ...


4

The wiki page on Mir space walks has a note for each of these spacewalks. Nothing went wrong, but the reason for them were small routine tasks not taking much time. He just returned after the tasks were done. A little more detail on the EO-20 spacewalk can be found on page 42 of this pdf. More about the EO-26 spacewalk is here.


4

I have a (probably exhaustive) list of every smelting experiments that where done on the space stations (Sayult 5-7; mir) I could post it but it would take time to compile (There was many experiments from different countries; including USA, Cuba, and Europeans). Many of them where simple alloys. The idea was to study the whole process. Some of the ...


4

There has been a book on the topic I can not seem to find from my memory. However in searching I found a good resource, in the PDF at NASA called Mir Heritage. https://www.hq.nasa.gov/pao/History/SP-4225/documentation/mhh/mirheritage.pdf Looks like someone Wiki-ized the PDF into web pages: Wiki'ed version What is interesting is how they depict the state ...


3

Yes. It's still early when Tsibliyev slips out of the quarantine rooms in the Prophylactorum ... Dragonfly, Bryan Burrough, page 68 This was in preparation for the Soyuz-25 mission to Mir. Crewmembers flying to Mir on the Shuttle went through a normal Shuttle quarantine. "We'd like to thank all the people down on Earth," he continued. "There was ...


1

It would be kind of pointless - at least for a free-flying satellite. Even the largest objects in low earth orbit require a telescope, a good pass (location, lighting, weather, etc.) and no small amount of skill to even resolve the shape of the object. So the audience of such an advertisement would be extremely small. Here's a great example of imaging ISS ...


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