14

For simple stability, you need the center of gravity to be in front of the center of pressure. You can find the center of gravity by hanging the rocket from a string with a loop that slips along the body. The balance point is the center of gravity. You should measure it twice, once with a fresh engine installed, parachute packed, wadding, etc, (launch ...


8

Those two graphs are not showing the same thing. The lecture slide is misleadingly labeled, but the original paper makes clear that the table is only showing neutrons, mostly produced by shield spallation. That does go up with added shielding (no shielding means no spallation) but the overall dose including other sources goes down. See figure 7 in the ...


4

Maybe Systems Tool Kit could be helpful: https://www.agi.com/products/engineering-tools It's a powerful tool, and there is also the possibility to have a free license, although it does not include all capabilities. I have used it on Windows 10, but I cannot tell about Windows 8.


4

The level of detail you seem to want probably requires the use numerical radiation software. I would recommend the free SPENVIS package made available by the European Space Agency or SRIM software. SRIM has to be purchased though, so it may not be ideal for your usage. I have used both, SRIM focuses on the effectiveness of a material as shielding given some ...


3

The number of stages required to reach a given orbit varies with the design of the stages and the specifics of the payload. For liquid rocket engine stages, it's most typical to see two stages to low Earth orbit, and either two or three to geosynchronous orbit. Solid rockets have a lower specific impulse (a measure of fuel efficiency) so launchers using ...


2

SaVi runs under Windows. It can be run under the Windows Linux Subsystem, under Cygwin, or under VirtualBox. And how to get it running is fully documented. See https://savi.sourceforge.io/install/ And SaVi includes GPS and GNSS simulations.


1

There is no answer to that question specifically. Atmosphere aside, reaching orbit requires that you have horizontal orbital velocity at your insertion velocity (e.g.: around 8.7 km/s at 140 km altitude). To do this, your stage or stages must provide you with a total change in velocity (hereafter called delta-V or dV) that is equal to that orbital velocity. ...


1

This will be highly dependent on the characteristics of your fuel tanks, engines, and payload. A rocket uses stages because it's a good way to drop weight that's no longer needed, most notably, empty fuel tanks. A single-stage rocket approaching the end of its burn is still lugging around an almost-empty fuel tank. You could split that evenly into two stages,...


1

We recently developed a web API that provides access to the EGM2008 model, as implemented by the open-source GeographicLib Gravity library. Geoid undulation values calculated using the API agree with corresponding values generated by the official EGM2008 harmonic synthesis program to within 1 mm. The API is open and available here in case that satisfies your ...


1

What Montenbruck and Gill call the "dynamic solid tide" is exactly what I was referring to in my answer to your related question. Can we think of the solid tide similarly - as flowing magma? Absolutely not. There are isolated pockets of partial melt near the crust/mantle boundary, and a layer of weak material just below (the asthenosphere). However, it's ...


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