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21

To answer the question literally: you'd be looking for NASA Apollo Trajectory (NAT) data files. The report Apollo Mission 11, Trajectory Reconstruction and Postflight Analysis Volume 1 (PDF) provides a summary for Apollo 11 and mentions that the raw NAT data is available in Volume 2 of the report. I have yet to find Volume 2 though, perhaps because The ...


6

To my knowledge there has been very little done in the 21st century. Here is a subsection of a page on space elevators and orbital tethers that lists tethers missions. The last two paragraphs are discouraging: Tethers Unlimited flew a tether demonstration named the "Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST)" experiment as part of a set of a small ...


6

Yes, it wasn't uncommon. Types of food used on the first 25 Space Shuttle missions included thermostabilized food in flex pouches or cans, rehydratable foods and beverages in square packages, and IM and NF foods in transparent plastic pouches. (emphasis mine) IM = Intermediate Moisture NF = Natural Form Apologies for picture quality. The can ...


5

I think this is it. It's part of a fabulous 6 Part series on Apollo called Moon Machines. Other parts covered the computer, the lunar module etc. I think this series is the best documentary I've seen about Apollo.


5

If such a thing happened, it would most likely have been during the approach and rendezvous of the LM ascent stage with the CM, as Conrad and Bean were returning from the lunar surface. The most challenging part of the mission would be behind them and there would be a little window of time where they could maneuver around on the RCS thrusters without any ...


4

I googled it for you. NASA astronaut requirements have changed with NASA's goals and missions. A pilot's license and engineering experience is still one route a person could take to becoming an astronaut, but it’s no longer the only one. Today, to be considered for an astronaut position, U.S. citizens must meet the following qualifications: ...


4

Every time, apparently. But mostly they had a white thermal cover over them. This is Neal Armstrong's Apollo 11 helmet from here. Apparently credible but unsourced discussion here: http://www.collectspace.com/ubb/Forum14/HTML/000900.html (see "Matt T"'s comments).


2

While more outer planet missions have not 'failed' it is worth noting that many of them have had major problems. Juno was not able to reach target orbit, Galileo had antenna and other issues, Genesis sample return failed to deploy parachute and voyager 2 lost a transmitter among others. Generally lander and to a lesser extent orbiter missions are more ...


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