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Yes, they were tracking Perseverance in real time, i.e. as soon as telemetries arrived. But they arrived 12 minutes after the events happened. To avoid ambiguities and misunderstandings, two times are used: mission time and Earth-received time. We also talk about RTLT (Roundtrip Light Time) or RTD (Roundtrip Delay), i.e. the time you have to wait to receive ...


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"Design concept" sounds like it's Technology Readiness Level 2: "technology concept and/or application formulated". In short, what UNSC-Tech has delivered is a paper design for a rocket engine. For comparison, NERVA reached TRL 6, firing a prototype engine into a near-vacuum.


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For a brief overview, let's look at some NASA outreach material The main points being: Be a U.S. citizen Possess a master's degree* in a STEM field, including engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science or mathematics, from an accredited institution. Have at least two years of related professional experience obtained after degree ...


0

Fantastic question, and one that really touches on fundamental points in science. This question will probably be closed because it's not a good fit for Space StackExchange, but Skeptics StackExchange might accept it. philosophy.stackexchange might take it. I'm sure other people have suggested more convincing lines of evidence, but here's one attempt, since ...


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From the open access article The Mars 2020 Engineering Cameras and Microphone on the Perseverance Rover: A Next-Generation Imaging System for Mars Exploration, emphasis at the end mine, Data Storage Unit (DSU) In addition to six cameras and a microphone, the EDLCAM system includes two data storage units (DSUs) and two USB3 hubs. The DSU is an off-the-shelf ...


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Simply because the rewards aren't all that great, and haven't merited the added complexity. The potential improvements of tri-propellant mixes are limited by fairly simple chemistry (especially once you eliminate the options with toxicity or cost issues), and to get them you're adding another tank, another pump, more plumbing, all of which adds dry mass that ...


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How was DSCOVR fixed? What software changes were implemented to allow sufficiently dynamic attitude determination from star cameras? What kinds of algorithms were added to make this possible? The DSCOVR mission did suffer a "pointing hardware issue" in late June 2019, according to the 2020 NASA Earth Science Senior Review Report, pdf at: https://...


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"Did mission control track Perseverance in real-time during it's landing?" No, the landing is performed autonomously using Terrain-Relative Navigation. The transmission delay from Mars to Earth involves: the speed of electricity through the wiring (which adds very little extra time) the speed of processing, and encoding for error free ...


5

No, when the announcer says "touchdown confirmed" and they all cheer the rover has landed a bit under 12 minutes ago. At that time Mars was about 210,000,000 km away from Earth. Light has a velocity of about 300,000 km/s in a vacuum. So it takes 700 seconds or about 12 minutes to reach Earth. When they talk about "current velocity" they ...


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I don't think that when the mission planners and engineers sat down to decide what goes on the rover, things were ruled out because they cost too much money They absolutely do. Let's clear up some misconceptions. NASA has a budget. We can examine samples on Earth far better than any robot could. After some spectacular failures, the US has gotten very good ...


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One of the reasons for the sample caching that was not mentioned yet in any of the other answers, is that we want to preserve pristine samples from before humans went to Mars. It is looking at least plausible that we will send life (more precisely humans) to Mars in one of the next 5 transfer windows. It is highly likely that the number of Mars missions will ...


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I'll just address the last point: "Sample return is cheaper than packing expensive science equipment into the rover" -- The rover is already expensive enough that cost is basically no object. Well, it is simply not the case that cost is no object. They didn't decide to put a rover with a mass of a tonne on Mars because, well, that seemed like a ...


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It is important to not underestimate the value and power of "the big labs we have on Earth". They are still doing experiments on the examples returned from the Apollo missions. And besides, we still have a grand total of 0 Mars samples here on Earth1. We could benefit a whole lot from at least an example or two. 1except of course for Martian ...


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"Trade" secrets? I recall hearing that as the reason for no images of the screens in the SpaceX spacecraft. The controls and data on the screen was considered a trade secret and so was not to be shown to the public as that might give data helpful to SpaceX competitors. I expect that there is plenty of data on the screens at a mission control ...


3

Al = aluminum is a solid metal, RP1, O2 and H2 are stored as liquids within the tanks of a rocket. If you know a method to store a liquid preparation of aluminum that may be pumped into a rocket tank and after ignition pumped into a combustion chamber, we all here would like to read about it. Molten hot alumium is not useful in a rocket tank, it needs ...


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In trying to explain my feelings on this question in comments on the other answer, I came around to a possible explanation -- There could be a real PR cost to publishing raw data streams in real time. There's certainly a vocal subset of space geeks who want to see this. It would inevitably spawn hours of commentary in forums and on YouTube, folks with a wide ...


21

A long, long time ago, I managed to arrange to get two passes to see the first light from one of the Voyager flybys of Jupiter. I collected on lots of debts and pulled lots of strings to get those passes. I brought a date. She. Was. Bored. (Needless to say, that was the end of that relationship.) And that was the first light from a vehicle that whose sole ...


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NASA releases technology through its technology transfer program, for companies who want to develop NASA innovations into commercial products: https://technology.nasa.gov/ Spinoffs using NASA tech: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/spinoff Here is a list of some of the more well-known spinoffs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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This student competition involved writing code to command the SPHERES. The scenario and requirements were presented as follows: The Red SPHERES Satellite is in trouble. Increasing numbers of satellites are being deployed to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to study Earth’s atmosphere, climate, land, oceans, and weather. To protect the success of this important ...


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It would slow down because of 2 things: Friction and magnetism The friction part is obvious, as there is air in space and no machine can have 100% efficiency. I think your confused on how windmills produce energy, its not by the blades spinning, its by the magnets/electromagnets slowing it down aka taking energy away from it and making electricity.


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It seems to me they made it as open as they could and still have it work, but that's probably not quite open enough to gather the signal on your own without some significant effort. The best source I've found on the signal itself is Juno Telecommunications (2012), with "Detecting Juno's ‘Heartbeat’" (2020) as runner-up, and Juno Raw Data (Level 0) ...


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