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16

The radar altimeter was intended only for landing, to provide a direct, precise measurement of the altitude of the vehicle above the runway. It locked on around 5000 feet altitude but was primarily useful only in the final stages of landing, from an altitude of 100 feet down. It was also intended for use in the autolanding system, which was never used ...


10

I am a software developer and with all the resources available today I cannot fathom where one could even start such an endeavour. There are plenty of computer-based systems to this day that have to live with such limitations. There are plenty of embedded systems where 2^16 (65536) bytes of memory remains a luxury. After all, on machines that use 16 bit ...


19

In many of the early probes, up until close to Apollo there were not true computers on space probes. All computing was done on earth and the onboard electronics was known as a sequencer, for Pioneer 10 it had 222 possible commands 5 of which could be readied. Early Venus probes sent data by mechanically switching different sensors to modulate a CW ...


21

(originally answered to "Samples of old guidance software") The first that comes to mind is the Github repository of the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer (AGC). The repository has both Command Module and Lunar Module software, but note that it is transcribed from hardcopies, so it might not be fully complete (yet). You can find a simulator of the AGC on the ...


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