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Eyes do strange things in microgravity (when you consider they're deformable bags of fluid, this isn't too surprising). This report outlines the changes that can be identified after just a short parabolic flight. Eye test charts provide a way to investigate this without requiring heavy equipment or specialists. This study appears to be an on-going project ...


37

NASA has been studying the effects of microgravity on astronauts' eyes for at least a few years. This article from Space.com from 2012 talks about some of the findings from that time. In a new study, researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the eyes and brains of 27 astronauts who spent an average of 108 days in space aboard NASA's ...


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According to ABC News, yes: But now, as American astronauts spend more and more time in space, they've noticed they're returning to Earth with a surprising malady: They cannot focus their eyes properly after they come home, and for some the problem seems permanent. ... A fifth of the astronauts tested showed a flattening of the rear of the ...


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Yes, it was performed during Gemini 5 and 7. Here's the report. ... Ground observation sites were provided on the Gates Ranch, 40 miles north of Laredo, Texas, and on the Woodleigh Ranch, 90 miles south of Carnarvon, Australia. At the Texas site, 12 squares of plowed, graded and raked soil 2000 by 2000 feet were arranged in a matrix of 4 squares deep and ...


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Yes, the 1C pathway has been successfully linked to ocular health of astronauts, and it seems Scott Smith is still involved in the research. A study involving 49 space station astronauts established a definitive link: [Scott] Smith says, “We found two genetic variances in the enzymes that facilitate the one carbon pathway. This may help explain why some ...


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While astronauts on the ISS have developed eyesight problems, it is for completely different reasons than what you suggest in your question. The distance of objects that these astronauts focus on is not a problem. In terms of optics, the human eye treats everything past about 20 feet away the exact same, so looking out of the cupola at Earth should give the ...


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