6

GMAT has been released under the Apache license since R2013a, so I'd say it's about as wide open as you can get.


5

You might be interested in the work of Libre Space Foundation it's a non-profit organization that develops open-source technologies (they are based in Greece). LSF builds several open-source projects for space applications. Including SatNOGS a network of satellite ground-stations and has also build UPSat the first open-hardware and software satellite ...


4

Here is what the NASA Software FAQ says: The release type determines who can have a NASA software code. If you meet the access criteria for the code (as defined below), NASA can transfer the software to you. Release types: General Public Release: For codes with a broad release and no nondisclosure or export control restrictions Open Source ...


1

Pure Space Exploration is a bit tricky to have an open source project, as many of the items fall under the realm of ITAR restrictions, which probits the sharing of technical data. That being said, let me point you in a few directions: AMSAT- The amateur radio satellite group. This group has been around for a long while, building amateur radio satellites. ...


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