60

There are two major factors at play. First, NASA doesn't own the designs of many of the technologies they use; they contract with private companies to develop them. Technological knowledge does flow back and forth between NASA and those companies, but those companies are in competition with one another, so they don't want their detailed designs made public. ...


57

There are many reasons. They include money, intellectual property, regulations, and Elon Musk. Money. Building open source software is relatively inexpensive, sometimes ridiculously inexpensive. No equipment is needed as most programmers have their own computers. There are many open source software projects where the developers do their work for free. ...


43

Had a bit of a gander at what NASA Technical Report Server and Semantic Scholar had to offer and found a couple things that I reckon might be helpful. NASA created a 1/10 scale model of the Saturn V for a study vehicle dynamics and you can read the report here This gives us these two schematics. They also created a 1/25 scale model for aerodynamic testing. (...


28

There's a more detailed profile drawing available for download at the bottom of this Heroic Relics page. Here's a representative slice: It used to be possible to get an inexpensive print of a cleaned-up, white-on blue version of this, 180cm long. (I have one, it's beautiful. The custom frame cost much more than the print.)


22

A long, long time ago, I managed to arrange to get two passes to see the first light from one of the Voyager flybys of Jupiter. I collected on lots of debts and pulled lots of strings to get those passes. I brought a date. She. Was. Bored. (Needless to say, that was the end of that relationship.) And that was the first light from a vehicle that whose sole ...


14

There are aspects of what NASA does that cannot be divulged because NASA does indeed rely on trade secrets held by private companies (Russell's first point). There are other aspects of what NASA does that cannot be divulged because there's not much difference between accurately landing a probe on a specific point on Mars and accurately making a nuclear ...


10

NASA just released their 2017-2018 software catalog which lists many different types of software used by NASA. Access requirements and restrictions are as follows: General Public Release—For codes with a broad release and no nondisclosure or export control restrictions Open Source Release—For collaborative efforts in which programmers improve upon codes ...


9

In trying to explain my feelings on this question in comments on the other answer, I came around to a possible explanation -- There could be a real PR cost to publishing raw data streams in real time. There's certainly a vocal subset of space geeks who want to see this. It would inevitably spawn hours of commentary in forums and on YouTube, folks with a wide ...


9

GMAT has been released under the Apache license since R2013a, so I'd say it's about as wide open as you can get.


8

You might be interested in the work of Libre Space Foundation it's a non-profit organization that develops open-source technologies (they are based in Greece). LSF builds several open-source projects for space applications. Including SatNOGS a network of satellite ground-stations and has also build UPSat the first open-hardware and software satellite ...


7

Several papers have been published on liquid rocket engines. Below is a collection of some. Some links are from ResearchGate so you need an account there (free for academics/students). With 3D files: Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) - Liquid-Propellant Engine (LPE) Designs Papers without 3D models: USC Liquid Propulsion Lab (USCLPL) - Balerion ...


5

Here is what the NASA Software FAQ says: The release type determines who can have a NASA software code. If you meet the access criteria for the code (as defined below), NASA can transfer the software to you. Release types: General Public Release: For codes with a broad release and no nondisclosure or export control restrictions Open Source ...


3

"Trade" secrets? I recall hearing that as the reason for no images of the screens in the SpaceX spacecraft. The controls and data on the screen was considered a trade secret and so was not to be shown to the public as that might give data helpful to SpaceX competitors. I expect that there is plenty of data on the screens at a mission control ...


3

Frankly, until 3d printing gets significantly better (as in print circuit boards and complex electronics better than printers print thermoplastics today), "open source hardware" doesn't really make sense because it doesn't have the key advantages that open source software does: Accessibility: Anyone with an internet-capable device can download an ...


3

Pure Space Exploration is a bit tricky to have an open source project, as many of the items fall under the realm of ITAR restrictions, which probits the sharing of technical data. That being said, let me point you in a few directions: AMSAT- The amateur radio satellite group. This group has been around for a long while, building amateur radio satellites. ...


2

Maybe The closest thing we have to using ITAR to regulate "software" would be 3D printed gun CAD files. Specifically a company called Defense Distributed makes CAD files for 3D printed guns and the US government used ITAR to stop them from distributing the files online On Thursday, Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson received a letter from the ...


1

NASA releases technology through its technology transfer program, for companies who want to develop NASA innovations into commercial products: https://technology.nasa.gov/ Spinoffs using NASA tech: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/spinoff Here is a list of some of the more well-known spinoffs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


1

Your best bet is to implement the specification from the DSN Handbook in GNU Radio. This has been done on at least one deep space mission recently.


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