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7

You don't have enough information. You need a minimum of one more value to determine the true anomaly such as the time of perihelion passage. In general six values and a timestamp are needed to fully specify a Keplerian orbit. The reason six values and a timestamp are needed in the general case is that the two body problem is a second order differential ...


4

They state: Links to the OEMs and more details to follow. Which hopefully means those will be posted before the page is taken down. If not, JPL Horizons can provide ephemerides for the ISS. Its interface has a bit of a learning curve, so it may be a good idea to start playing with it now, in case you have a regular need for ISS trajectory data. Lots of ...


3

Your user need to supply you with information about mean anomaly at fixed time (epoch) $M(t_0)$, and then mean anomaly at the moment $t_1$. Or about known mean motion $n$ instead of current mean anomaly $M(t_1)$. You can also get the mean motion as square root of gravitational parameter $\mu$ divided by cube of semi-major axis, and also as $2\pi$ divided by ...


2

The answer is much depending on how realistic you try to model "your world" and how small your error margin (are you trying to hit a "POINT" or an "AREA"?) is. Do you need the solution for minimum delta V or "a possible" delta V? Most simple: reduce it to a 2D scenario with no atmospheric drag - simple hohmann transfer ...


1

I interpret this as "minimum delta-v as a function of an arbitrary elliptic orbit and an arbitrary point on the surface". Furthermore, as a pure orbital mechanics problem, I assume the Earth to be perfectly spherical and ignore the atmosphere. However, I will still allow the Earth to rotate. The general case can always be solved by increasing ...


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