The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
3

If you look at this delta-v map of the solar system, you can see that to get from the surface of the Moon to Neptune transfer requires about 7.67 km/s of delta-v. To get to Neptune from the surface of Mars requires 10.56 km/s of delta-v. So even if you were magically transported to Mars first, it would still take more energy to get to Neptune than it would ...


3

I think each person will visualise this problem differently. Personally, whilst formal papers describing separation strategies can be interesting I often find that they miss out on the basics (though I couldn't comment on the article you mention). Here is a simple explanation that applies between any pair of orbits but is particularly used at GEO, ...


3

Neither. In the old times, geostationary satellites had their longitude windows, each with around 1°, and tried to keep themselves at the center os this window. This strategy was good enough for its time, when few satellites with poor attitude controls were located in this orbit. Nowadays, geostationary spacecraft are usually in a "collocation window", ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible