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Field of view. Landsat satellites by design have a rather narrow field of view (185 km across) so as to reduce issues with off-nadir resolution while Amazonia-1 by design has a much wider field of view (850 km) so as to reduce the time delay between repeated observations of the same locale. The key sensor on Amazonia-1 is the Advanced Wide Field Imaging ...


4

Yes, they're all just forms of the same relation that are specific to different values of eccentricity. This is one of the few topics treated in greater detail in Richard Battin's An Introduction to the Mathematics and Methods of Astrodynamics (chapter 4, pages 141–173) than in Vallado, including more biographical anecdotes about the mathematicians who ...


4

Landsat orbits repeat their ground tracks almost exactly every sixteen days. Each Landsat sees some part of the Amazon three to six times per day, as the ground tracks @Alfonso Gonzalez posted show, but the interval between one Landsat swath of some part of the Amazon and the next image of the same part of the Amazon by the same Landsat imager, for greatest ...


3

Sun-synchronous orbits are useful for global coverage since they are near polar orbits. Attached is the plot of the groundtracks of Amazonia-1 and Landsat-7 for a 24 hour period. So in one day, each of the satellites makes 2 passes over the Amazon. However the Amazon is massive, and the flyovers are on the order of tens of minutes, so full coverage of the ...


2

Along with escape velocity and sphere of influence considerations, one also needs to account for solar radiation pressure and the body's gravity field when analyzing orbital mechanics around small bodies. Due to the relatively large ratio of magnitude of solar radiation pressure acceleration vs. gravity (since the gravity is so small), the only ~stable ...


2

The answer given before seems to work great, I am just here to give a different answer if you're more interested in learning about the software that goes into numerically propagation trajectories and 3D plotting The general procedure to go about solving this problem would be: Read TLE. It will give you inclination, RAAN, eccentricity, argument of periapsis, ...


1

The process of converting between Keplerian / classical orbital elements to ECI state vector is outlined in a number of books, a popular one being "Orbital Mechanics for Engineering Students" by Howard D. Curtis. I'll give a brief summary here: The orientation of the orbital plane is described by the right ascension, inclination, and argument of ...


1

This is a supplementary answer, as it discusses Falcon Heavy and not Starship which I've asked about. I think it adds some background to the issue. It depends a lot on the size and capability of the second stage that would be put on top of a Falcon Heavy. A small kick state on top of FH would still require a gravitational assist from another planet, and this ...


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