76

Yes, here is a picture of the Curiosity lander spacecraft taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The picture was taken about one minute prior to the landing of Curiosity. Image from https://www.space.com/16946-mars-rover-landing-seen-from-space.html If landed craft are allowed, there are also pictures of Mars rovers from Mars orbiters, asteroid ...


53

The Mars Odyssey orbiter was photographed by Mars Global Surveyor in 2005. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mgs_odyssey.gif https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07941 Figure 1: Why There are Two Images of Odyssey NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft appears twice in the same frame in this image from the Mars Orbiter Camera aboard NASA's Mars ...


38

The astronauts did a lot of training with the cameras. The used 60 mm wide angle lens (angular field diagonal 63°, side 47°) and the large image format (53 * 53 mm) helped them in framing. The 500 mm lens had a special notch and bead viewfinder, see first image. Image of a suited training from this page. Apollo 16 geologic training-exercises in Sudbury, ...


29

some examples: LRO images of the Apollo landing sites. This is Apollo 11: Cassini and Huygens: this is Huygens as seen by Cassini, 12 hours after Huygens was released. Rosetta and Philae. During descent: Philae's final landing location: Hayabusa 2 and its many landers. This is a photo of Minerva-II-2 taken by Hayabusa 2:


28

Ed Fendell, a controller in Houston was controlling the rover camera. It’s in the EVA-3 mission logs. https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15.clsout3.html


21

Added as a (now largely unnecessary) extension to the explanation of the training Well framed images, such as this one actually weren't that well framed a little black border added at the top really helps (thank goodness there are no antennas sticking up, eh?) and cutting out that noisy foreground has the double benefit of leaving just a single track of ...


20

From the Johns Hopkins University page: It is possible that another flyby target can be found and reached with New Horizons' remaining fuel supply. And after that? Another exciting possibility is that we can dramatically augment New Horizons' capabilities by uploading new observing and onboard data-reduction software once the spacecraft's flyby ...


18

For a case with more extreme relative motion than most of the other answers, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (polar orbit) imaged the LADEE orbiter (close to equatorial orbit) in 2014: The LADEE appears rather distorted because the image was taken with a pushbroom camera, not the more familiar framing camera, so LADEE moves between lines relative to the ...


17

The answer is on this National Geographic page about the best pictures from NASA's official photographer Bill Ingalls: If you love space, odds are you’ve admired the work of Bill Ingalls. He has been NASA’s senior contract photographer for 30 years, a job that has taken him across the world—but not yet beyond it—to cover major moments in space exploration. ...


15

You can also find photos of some Mars rovers from various orbiters/satellites: Opportunity from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter After a planet-wide dust storm in June 2018 blocked the Opportunity rover's solar panels, NASA scientists waited for images from the planet to clear. This image, captured Sept. 20 by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, was among the ...


14

The principles of Difference Image Analysis (DIA) or Difference Imaging, which is very common in modern astronomy for finding new transient sources (e.g. asteroids, variable stars, including microlensing events, and supernovae), is simple in principle but complicated by a lot of practical details caused by real-world observations. The basis, which is set ...


10

And there are two other secrets in most professional photography: For one they sometimes reframe pictures before they get published. And this could be done even in good old analog time. Tilted a little - just move it when exposing the prints. Too much background - just crop the image so it fits better. And so on... And secondly: only publish the good ...


10

In a similar vein to Organic Marble's answer: The Phoenix lander was captured during its descent on May 25, 2008, hanging from its parachute with crater Heimdall in the distant background, and again after landing on Mars and deploying its solar panels, by the HiRISE camera on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. (Source: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/phoenix/...


8

The highest resolution images come from the HiRISE camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. With an angular resolution of one micro-radian it has a ground resolution of about 0.3 m (12 inches) Here's an image of the Phoenix lander on its parachute, at a resolution of about 30cm taken from https://static.uahirise.org/images/2008/details/cut/...


8

Firstly, it's going to take a big rocket to do this (larger than any rocket we have built so far btw). We're travelling together with the Earth, so our speed relative to the Earth is 0. Thus, this isn't really "coming to a halt", it's more like "speeding up" to 67,000 mph (30 km/s). Does the Earth blur past at 30 km/s? Not really. Earth ...


7

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS The image above shows the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on the turret of Curiosity's robotic arm. The reddish circle near the center is the window of MAHLI's dust cover. In the accompanying text it is said that there's a thin film of Martian dust on it, and that the front window is made of sapphire. This article tells us ...


7

That's STS-134, the final mission of Endeavour. There is a higher quality video here but sadly it cuts away just as the vehicle enters the cloud deck. Lots of cool ascent video here from that mission but a quick skim didn't show the cloud deck penetration. There's a cool shot from the Shuttle ...


6

NASA photographed what was left of the India Vikram Lunar Lander from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter


6

From this answer: In the Planetary Society's Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist Emily Lakdawalla's article Fun with a new data set: Chang'e 3 lander and Yutu rover camera data there are several photos from Chang'e-3 and the Yutu rover. above: Chang'e 3 photographed by the Yutu rover, January 13, 2014 read more Chinese Academy of Sciences / ...


6

Yet another example, this time involving a spacecraft that was photographed twice, by two different other spacecraft, beyond Earth orbit. The Beagle 2 Mars lander hitchhiked to Mars on the back of Mars Express, and, in a similar vein to Cassini–Huygens above, Mars Express photographed Beagle 2 after the two separated: (Image by the European Space Agency, ...


5

The Apollo 13 Service Module was photographed from the Apollo 13 LEM on the way back to Earth. Not sure if this is what you were looking for since they were part of the same mission, were on the way back to Earth and were not far away when they separated and the pictures were taken. On the other hand, they were NOT in orbit.


5

Unless I oversaw in answers already given - the manufacturer modified the controls of the camera slightly, the "rings" received levers so you could move them easy even with the thick gloves, and the usual small knob was replaced likewise by a lever that could be easier operated with gloves https://cdn.hasselblad.com/e407a3b3-714b-4efa-aa74-...


4

It's two reasons actually. Since the MAHLI has a narrow FOV, it can't fit the entire rover in one photograph. Similar to the reason why you don't see your arm when you take a selfie. The camera's FOV isn't big enough to fit your arm (unless you point the camera down, then your arm will be visible). However, this is only the case when the MAHLI images the ...


3

Viking Orbiter "violet-light" picture 34A13, it shows the region east and northeast of the Argyre basin during winter in the southern hemisphere. (a) Most of the snow-covered Argyre basin is shown. This was taken just after the winter solstice when solar heating was minimal. Further down it says the location is 47° S, 22° W I found it in NASA-SP-441 ...


3

You can find hundreds if not thousands of such photos by using the Planetary Data System search engine. Although most are not that "pretty". Here's a sample query for Mars, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Terminator. One of the images returned has this label DATA_SET_ID = "MRO-M-HIRISE-2-EDR-V1.0" DATA_SET_NAME = "MRO ...


3

That's what I found so far. In Abdrahimov, Basilevsky [2002] Venera photos are used for geological context interpretation comparing with orbital radar data. qoutes: The photogeologic analysis shows that the materialof plains with wrinkle ridges (Pwr) dominates the Venera-9 landing-site ellipse (it occupies ~60% of thearea of the ellipse). The material of ...


2

Video recorders weren't adapted to work in orbit in 1962. Video recorders are characterised by recoding tracks across the tape, typically with helical scan heads, recording line and framing synchronisation information, and audio. Their prime function is to playback the information they record in the same order and rate it was received, although later models ...


2

Were there really video tape recorders orbiting the Earth in 1962? Yes! The first was launched in 1960 only two and a half years after Sputnik-1. There were video reel-to-reel tape recorders in the 1960's, even for home or educational use in schools, but they did suffer from degradation and occasional tape-eating if the mechanism was not carefully and ...


2

Will they really be able to “see” OSIRIS-REx from Australia? With meteor cameras? Yes, we were! For all those who are interested, here is the preprint of the paper that resulted from the observations and is currently in review. Along with a conference abstract from AMOS 2018. arXiv: Recreating the OSIRIS-REx Slingshot Manoeuvre from a Network of Ground-...


2

Satellites, for the most part, do not emit visible light. Instead, they reflect light. Thus, other than portions of that light that are absorbed/scattered by the various reflective surfaces of the satellite, the spectra measured will be that of the light source shining upon them. When satellites are bright enough to be seen at night on the earth's surface, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible