27

Yes. (But it requires a bit of dishonesty.) Simply because an "extinction level" asteroid does sufficiently limit the possible nature of the object. To be extinction-level, it would need to be quite large. More than 3km in diameter. To be asteroid, it would need to be an inner-solar-system object. This pretty much limits it to being a large ...


7

Perhaps. Perhaps not. There are programs to look for these asteroids. Sometimes they work. Sometimes not. You assumed in your question that it would be detected. Just how much warning time is there? Hours? Weeks? Decades? If a body is detected very far out, it will take only a tiny nudge to make it miss Earth. Current space programs are very conscious of ...


5

Probably the first key point here, is that if an asteroid is detected 6 months out, it will be on it's final orbit, with geometry something like this So any attempt to intercept is not doing fuel efficient transfer orbits which by definition take half an orbit period to complete, instead this will be a brute force maneuver first canceling earths orbital ...


2

It would depend massively on the size of the asteroid, it's composition and how far out it was detected. For the true planet killers it is extremely likely that the asteroid would be detected years in advance. Asteroids "planet killer" like Apophis are simply too big (Apophis is over 300m) to be missed. This gives us a significant advantage as it ...


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