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The two antennas need to point at Earth during morning and evening on Mars. They are oriented in opposite directions so that one can be used in the morning and one in the evening. The science goal requires continuous contact over several years, so all the relative orientation changes of the antennas due to the movement of Mars need to be taken into account. ...


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The paper "Initial results from the InSight mission on Mars" published on 24 February 2020 in the journal Nature Geoscience states HP$^3$ and RISE have not yet collected sufficient data for meaningful analysis; thus their results will not be discussed here. The webpage for RISE does not report any problems with that instrument. In contrast, NASA has ...


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The answer is "it's complicated." If you start with Snell's Law(s) , they show that the degree of polarization at an interface depends both on the ratio $\frac{n_2}{n_1}$ and on the angle of incidence. Next, you have to deal with the nonuniform atmosphere (if any), and the properties of whatever reflective & transmissive materials are on the ...


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