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14

It's theoretically possible; the velocity of the exhaust plume is around 3000 m/s (pretty close to what you'd need for a translunar injection!) and the mass flow rate is ~270 kg/s, so if a small piece of debris fell off the stage into the plume, it could get quite a boost. It seems a little unlikely that a piece big enough to track would get kicked up in ...


6

SN10 like all recent Starship prototypes is very over powered. It has 3 Raptor engines each capable of producing in excess of 200 tonnes thrust and for safety reasons it also takes off with a fairly limited amount of propellants and burns through them at a rapid rate. Consequently it is necessary to throttle down and then power down the engines one by one. ...


3

Since this question was posted, plenty of exhaust plumes have been filmed from the ground giving a nice impression of the long term expansion behavior. So, no, I wouldn't call it bulb shaped, but yes, the exhaust expands in ...


3

We watched the launch live from about 60 miles north of the launch site. I also had the live feed on my phone. As the first stage separated, the thrusters fired to change the orientation of the vessel. Allowing for video lag, the puffs we saw live were matched with the seconds-later video. The video lacks "real life" resolution. We saw numerous arc ...


2

The orange color indicates they're running fuel-rich. With the methane/oxygen ratio out of whack there would be more carbon in the exhaust which burns orange. It's possible that engine was malfunctioning. SN10 aborted at T-0.1s because one engine was producing too much power. They decided to reset the systems and launch anyway. When transitioning into hover, ...


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