Hot answers tagged

29

You don't care about transporting H₂O. You want to transport hydrogen and oxygen atoms, and if that includes a few other atoms as baggage, that's no big deal. One easily available atom is carbon, as it can be extracted from CO₂. So you need two pipelines. Hydrogen has the nasty property of escaping pipelines, so you need to bind it to carbon to produce CH₄. ...


16

It is not coincidence and it does not apply to just the Earth. The Sun, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune all have sizable magnetic fields. Mercury and Ganymede have smaller but still noticeable magnetic fields. All of these bodies have one thing in common: They have a sizable amount of rotating, electrically conductive fluid somewhere beneath the ...


13

Canals? It's too cold on Mars for water to be liquid, so canals are not going to work. Pipes? ...would need to be constantly heated, so they would require quite a lot of energy. Hydrogen balloons? The atmosphere on Mars is very thin. Hydrogen zeppelins would work in theory, but they would generate even less excess lifting force compared to their ...


8

Could an relayer's orbit remain north of the moon? No. Such an orbit would have a center north of earth. Orbits about the earth have a center within the earth. An inclined relayer orbital plane must intersect earth's plane along a line passing through the center. A circular relayer orbit would spend half the time north of the moon's orbital plane and half ...


4

pipes In addition to other answers, while most of the time Martian temperatures average below zero, they reach positive side of the Celsius scale every day on most of the surface. That means that pipes with enough freeze-proof storage tanks interspersed throughout their run, and active pumping (draining pipes dry at night) should in theory allow a cheap and ...


4

You don't need to. There's a lot of subsurface water ice at many mid-latitude sites, where that ice is easily accessible -- only a few meters down, sometimes even exposed, and mostly pure.


4

It is not possible to do this with just one communication satellite orbiting around the Moon, due to the reasons described by @HopDavid. However, it can be done with just one comsat in Earth orbit. Imagine a satellite in polar orbit of Earth, with a high apogee and a low perigee. If the apogee is over the north pole, the comsat will be over the equatorial ...


4

I like a location on the rim of Shackleton crater near a so-called Peak of Eternal Light (PEL) which has eight small craters (1-3 km diameter) very much nearby. A power cable from a peak to the near side of a crater floor looks to be about 1-2 km distant. That area is also about equidistant between two PELs which if connected would provide continuous solar ...


3

Kamaz of Future Moon did this graphic of Whipple Crater: The deepest red near the top is thought to be a peak of nearly constant illumination. The deepest blue is a cold trap that might have rich volatile deposits. As can be seen by the spacing of the isolines, the crater floor's flat. Unfortunately the crater rim that enjoys near constant illumination is ...


3

That is completely possible, consider for example a planet tilted 90°. There, a pole gets maximal sunlight insolation comparable to $\frac{1}{\pi}$ of the time, compared to $\frac{1}{4}$ for the planet overall (the ratio between the area of a circle and a sphere). For bodies without an atmosphere, that therefore conducts heat poorly, this difference should ...


2

Yes, if you'll accept a sufficiently loose definition of "orbit". Put the satellite above Earth's north pole, deploy a solar sail to keep it there. Beware that it is going to be more than a million miles out, your lag time will be 10x what it is for a direct path transmission. Robert L. Forward's patent on this (although he was intending it for reaching ...


2

Moving the water requires energy and infrastructure. You'll want to liquefy the water and pipeline it around the planet to do that you'll need to heat it up which requires energy and infrastructure. I'd propose putting enormous LFTR reactors on the poles and build a big pipeline around the entire diameter or mars. You dump the waste heat from the reactors ...


1

It's a one-way ticket too. You want to be cultivating an ecosystem, and the water you pump into that ecosystem will be recycled. I've not really seen anyone else mention the fact that once you start bringing ice in from the poles (or wherever), there will begin to be an excess of it where it is being transported. For any long-term Mars solutions water ...


1

I see that many other answers or realistic propositions have been made. I would like to propose a rather out-there kind of idea. So the concept is that you could gather ice in some sort of bin with a deployable parachute large enough in size to slow the decent to an adequate speed in the Martian atmosphere. This bin could then be launched from near the poles ...


1

For what duration? Uranus, with its axis tilted 98 degrees, faces the Sun nearly head-on with one of the poles for a considerable part of its orbital period, while the other remains in the darkness - nearly all of the planet is subjected to lengthy polar day/polar night, and the vicinity of the pole facing the sun at given time will be the hottest area.


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