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3

While you asked for intentional large changes, there is also the Pioneer anomaly which was definitely an unintentional and unplanned small change in the probes orbit. This was most likely caused by thermal radiation being emitted from the probes unevenly providing a small and unexpected thrust.


9

The Dawn [1] deep space probe expended over 10 km/s of delta-v after its launch, mainly to enter an orbit around the asteroid Vesta and then transfer to and enter an orbit around Ceres. This is equivalent to the delta-v delivered by the launch vehicle (which was a Delta II + PAM-D solid third stage) [2]. As far as I know this is the current record for the ...


10

Ulysses was deployed from the Space Shuttle, burned its solid rocket and flew towards the south pole of Jupiter which swung it around by about 90 degrees straight up out of the ecliptic! Of course our Sun, being even more of a control-freak than mighty Jupiter said "Oh no you don't!" and maintained the spacecraft in a highly elliptical 6.2 year ...


8

The Japanese spacecraft Hiten was supposed to launch a lunar probe, the Hagoromo, into lunar orbit, but the Hagoromo failed, and so Hiten went into lunar orbit instead. Initially, Hiten was intended to only swing by the Moon and not enter lunar orbit. Upon the failure of the Hagoromo, the Hiten's trajectory was changed so it would be captured by the moon's ...


10

Voyager 1 In 1980, the two Voyager spacecraft passed Saturn. While Voyager 2 continued on to Uranus and Neptune, Voyager 1 could have either gone to Pluto or taken a closer look at Titan. The Voyager team opted for Titan, and the best route for this involved going under Saturn's south pole, which in turn redirected Voyager 1 up and out of the ecliptic ...


19

So first of all, every space probe changes direction constantly due to the gravitational attraction of the Sun, and the planets and moons. For instance the Parker Solar probe orbits the Sun every few months, changing its motion (as seen, for example by an observer stationary with respect to the Sun and above its North pole) through a full 360 degrees each ...


5

Summary: The time will depend on how the inside of the spacecraft is insulated, but if we assume that you are in contact with the metal shell of a spacecraft similar to the lunar module (and make a lot of approximations regarding convection in the Venusian atmosphere), you will get serious burns within 15 minutes. The assumptions I make break down as the ...


3

The question seems primarily interested in the rate of heat transfer from Venus to the spherical cow spacecraft via conduction and convection types of transfer. That includes both inelastic collisions of atmospheric molecules with the sphere and also adhesion of hot particulates and/or droplets of any aerosol if that happens. The high density of the ...


0

As the previous answer says, it might still be too soon for new missions to be planned based on the detection of phosphine published this septembre. However, it might already have an impact on missions that are already flying. Based on this article, BepiColombo and Parker Solar Probe will both be turned towards Venus as they fly by, in an attempt to confirm ...


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What does the discovery of phosphine mean for the future of Venusian exploration? It certainly adds some impetus. However, The discovery has not yet been independently confirmed. This alone is very important. What if the discovery was not a discovery at all? If confirmed, devising a measuring device that can withstand the extremely acidic nature of the ...


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