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30

Service module attachment point The service module (SM) was attached to the command module (CM) using tension members which pulled the two modules towards each other. The SM used cups that rest on the compression pads on the CM heatshield (also visible in your photo). This cross section shows the CM on the left, heat shield in the middle and the cups of ...


40

That is the remnant of one of the attachments between the Command and Service modules (there were three). Here is a cutaway drawing showing the bolt penetrating the heat shield (labeled "tension tie"). From Apollo Experience Report Spacecraft Structure Subsystem Here's a closer picture showing that the circular areas are not penetrations. Photo source ...


3

Following @JCRM's lead: rocket horsepower questions to the rescue! See this answer and this answer for derivations and explanations. Power If we assume that most of the kinetic energy of the air molecules striking the spacecraft is converted to heat (perhaps it's more like half or 2/3) then we can use the concept of "rocket power" which is really just the ...


42

There were no nominal activities for the middeck crew related to flying the vehicle. There were no switches or controls on the middeck accessible to seated crewmembers in the ascent/entry seats. The rectangular objects in the photo are middeck lockers which are located external to the avionics bays. Mission Specialist 3 (MS-3) did have responsibility over ...


-2

I don't see anyone mention here the aspect of heat. You say from a space capsule, but don't state a maximum altitude. To use a capsule, I assume you mean above the atmosphere. This means on reentry heat would be an issue. The friction of the atmosphere on the jumper as they decelerate from frictionless travel and orbital maintenance speeds. This is an ...


15

The Red Bull Stratos jump was done from about 39km up (high altitude balloon). It was fairly straightforward, in that he jumped and opened a parachute. His max speed was just above mach 1 (800mph/1300kpm roughly) and when he moved himself from the freefall to a more traditional skydive position, he was at a more tolerable 500mph/700kph. By the time he ...


36

Would you even be able to open the door? It would depend on the capsule, but since the Apollo 1 fire, one expects crewed American capsules to have explosively-jettisoned hatches that can be activated by the crew. If you had a regular skydiving parachute with you, is there any way you could skydive and survive? Yes. Terminal velocity for falling ...


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