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43

Leave? No. By now, any residual fuel in various landers will have leaked off, and nothing has the sort of chemistry capability to produce fuel from lunar materials. Get help? Maybe. Most of the landers still have working radios with radiation-hardened circuitry; it's just a matter of powering them up. Your best bet for this is probably the Lunar Rover ...


22

No. Without even considering consumables such as food or oxygen, there is nothing on the moon to regulate human body temperature or to allow one to dispose of the waste that would accumulate in your space suit if you did have something to eat or breathe. More directly addressing the question, none of the 'junk' on the moon has any method of propelling ...


18

Not very quickly, for a number of reasons. Here's a list of some of the reasons: Soyuz requires 2 astronauts just to fly it (Under nominal operations) It can only take down 3. Thus, 6 Soyuz launches would be required. (Note, this might be a reference to manned flight, Soyuz does have remote capabilities). Some work could probably be done to reduce that to 1 ...


17

There is a Soyuz capsule (source1) docked to the ISS at all times, allowing for immediate evacuation in an emergency. This limits the ISS to 3 people when it is the only capsule available. For Expidition 20, they docked 2 capsules, allowing for six astronauts at a time. Your scenario involves the destruction of these vessels and simultaneously ...


14

If you carry the right Allen wrench, yes There is a big golden arrow printed on the hatch that says "RESCUE". It points to a hole. Around the hole are instructions for opening the hatch. It even shows you which direction to turn! (Source: Apollo Program Summary Report page 4-32) More details about the hole: The exterior input is a socket in a ...


12

If you are on a random point of the moon's surface, facing the earth, in the mid-latitudes, and your ascent stage goes boom while you are walkabout, you are going to die. Period. Lets assume there is a fully-functional Space-1999 level lunar facility at another point on the moon. How will you navigate there? No GPS, and the landscape is rather featureless. ...


11

Building off of @dotanchoen's answer, specifically this part: In short, nobody on the planet could help you. Furthermore, almost nobody on the planet would help you even if they could. After the Columbia accident, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report asked NASA if there were options for the safe return of the crew. The rest of this answer ...


10

The answer depends on under what authority you launched from. If you launched from the United States with FAA approval, then I would assume that the Americans would be the first ones to call for help. However, I assure you, there is nothing that they could do to help you. Even if the space shuttle or another manned craft were still flying out of the US, you ...


10

Prior to 2006, STS could not be landed via Mission Control. The landing gear could only be operated manually. After the Columbia accident, the rest of the fleet was refitted with the RCO IFM cable, a 28-foot braided cable that the flight crew could use to link the cockpit with the shuttle's avionics bay and give Mission Control access to the appropriate ...


8

Types of Emergency The most probable causes of an emergency are Fire aboard, leak aboard, or life threatening illness aboard. A failure of Life Support is also a dire emergency... Fire and leak are the two most emergent of these. In order to render the need for a rescue flight, you would need to damage a Soyuz, possibly two. Self Rescue via Soyuz At ...


6

An on-orbit rescue tug isn't likely to be viable in the near future. General Automated docking is typically only done at the ISS and requires extra hardware, both the docking port and the radar systems to align vessels. This is a non-trivial amount of additional mass and power required just to allow a space tug to have a chance of rescuing your satellite ...


4

By themselves, a pair of SRBs with no payload would produce about 5500 m/s of ∆v, which gets them something more than half-way to orbit. They have a fairly poor ISP and propellant mass fraction. If you added a 100-ton second stage using storable hydrazine-family propellants, you could get about 5 tons of payload to LEO if that's your goal.


3

I don't know how well this would work, but there are Soyuz capsules attached to the ISS, one of which could come and get you, if the propulsion system was up to it. Russia and the US could split the cost (~200mUSD) - as dotancohan said, Russia could use the PR. It is still a long shot though.


3

It depends: if there's a mission already being prepared that you could use, you'd be in luck. Otherwise, you'd have to wait for a rocket and capsule to come off the production line. Your best chance of that happening soon is with a rocket that has a high rate of production. In 2014, 23 R-7 rockets were launched. 4 of these were Soyuz manned capsules, and 4 ...


2

There are a few variations on this, so let me talk about some of the limitations. I don't have a good grasp on the exact numbers, but hopefully this will give you an idea. I'm going to start with things that would allow you to re-use a mission, and what are some of the factors. The first step is to have a rocket in assembly that can have it's mission ...


2

I think the biggest issue would be fuel. Trips to the Moon were very carefully calculated: they brought just enough fuel to make the trip. The amount of residual fuel left behind in any of the landers remaining on the surface is minimal. It was minimal the day they landed. In the 40+ years since then there has surely been some leakage, and probably chemical ...


1

It was the Air Force Reserve's 920th Rescue Wing operating out of Patrick Air Force Base.


1

There is a fuel source: the lunar regolith. There is power to crack it: solar panels. But where are you going to get a manufacturing plant and where are you going to get enough food and water (let alone oxygen) to wait for that trickle of power to ever produce enough fuel? No indeed. You cannot get off. Most of what you need is present, but you will die of ...


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