25

Yes, the research on shielding from energetic particles of solar wind plasma using dipole magnetic field continues, and perhaps the best indication of that is the filing of the Spacecraft shield patent (1) in 2010, roughly 2 years after the publication of the Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion journal (2) that was noticed by the author of that Physics ...


21

YES, They have come back alive at least once, aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in the Mice Drawer System (made in Italy). STS-128 - Source: Mouse Hotel Opens on Space Station MDS was carried to the ISS on August 28, 2009, and returned on November 27th, 2009, setting the longest permanence in space for rodents of 91 days. Three wild type (Wt) and three PTN-...


19

It's Monday, so let me rain on this parade a little. Current magnetic shield designs are adequate to protect against ionizing radiation from the sun. They aren't sufficient to protect against galactic cosmic radiation, which has a lot more energy in each particle. To effectively block that would take a shield with energy 100x greater. If Bamford's shield ...


16

The test had to start somewhere. There are a number of reasons why they couldn't simply do a 6 person stay, that make it somewhat difficult at least. These include: There is a natural cycle to bring down astronauts from the ISS, in that a Soyuz needs to be replaced every 6 months. While in theory a crew could bring a Soyuz, and bring the old one down, that ...


15

Not on macroscopic scale. The Special Relativity theory is fairly well understood and says it's impossible for any objects that possess rest mass, period. The closer you get to speed of light the more energy you need to accelerate, additional energy gets increasingly converted towards mass instead of velocity, so to actually reach it you would need infinite ...


13

There's a whole Wikipedia page dedicated to this exact topic, so I'm just going to quote the first instance, and the rest is then available on the page: The first animals sent into space were fruit flies aboard a U.S.-launched V-2 rocket on February 20, 1947. The purpose of the experiment was to explore the effects of radiation exposure at high ...


10

There are entities that hope to mine asteroids, Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries. The proposed Asteroid Retrieval Mission is based upon the Keck Report, a paper outlining how a small Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) could be parked in lunar orbit. Co-authors of the Keck Report include Chris Lewicki (Chief engineer of Planetary Resources), J. S. ...


10

All kinds of research really, but let's start by quoting NASA's own page on Space Station Boosting Biological Research in Orbit: Studying the science of biology in microgravity opens a world of possibilities! Research ranges from plant growth to cell growth and from bacterial virulence to strength in human bones. The scope of biology research ...


10

The Russian medical monitoring of long term flight participants was not considered well done by the rest of the worlds medical establishment. The ISS has much more equipment, resources, and crew time to monitor than did Mir (Crew of 6 vs 3). This is a repeat with a larger (2 vs 1, yay!) sample set with better monitoring in place, using lessons learned ...


9

This article, titled Nuclear Pulse Propulsion Re-Examined, was published in late '05. There is also this article, which was posted in early '12. Unfortunately, despite much Googling, I wasn't able to find any real research on the subject after about the '90s, when Project Medusa was started by NASA.


9

This is an answer from email communication with the author of the 2012 paper. The way we understand catastrophic collisions (= events that disrupt entirely the target body), the larger blocks will re-accrete first. They are the most massive, and will therefore have a) a lower ejection speed, b) have more gravity to be pulled together. So after the impact, ...


8

We don't know. There was some research done on embryonic development of mice and rats in microgravity, both impregnated females sent to orbit and later recovered (mostly onboard Space Shuttle, but Russians also sent in orbit similar experiments), and even more frequently by using 3D clinostat to simulate microgravity via continuous three-dimensional rotation....


8

I don't think there are any papers about it, but here's what I've gleamed from my studies on it. As you mentioned, they use information from the DOD, specifically Space-Track, or C-SPOC, or J-SPOC. They are all really the same thing... Space Track will send out updates when predicted close approaches may happen to the satellite operator. SpaceX somewhere ...


7

The nematode, or roundworm, known as Caenorhabditis elegans, is able to reproduce fully in space from mating through development. Though simple, the nematode is an animal and it is one of the most studied creatures on the International Space Station. I am not aware of any other animals that have been observed to successfully reproduce in space. Here is the ...


7

The source of the data is the Radiation Environment Monitor. Lawrence S. Pinsky is listed as co-investigator. This Radiation Environment Monitor demonstration will provide information that is required to enable the design of an operational active personal space radiation dosimeter. The objectives of the experiment are to demonstrate the viability of this ...


7

The biggest obstacle of living on Titan is bound to be it's insane cold. People say space is cold, but space is a vacuum. A thermos bottle uses a vacuum as insulation. So wearing a space suit in a vacuum, in the shadows, it's not that hard to retain heat. There is no convection and conduction only happens on contact. However in an atmosphere that is only ...


6

As @Everyone said it's not regarding feasibility but it's matter of budget and absence of human rated space vehicle and components Budget Development of a fully autonomous orbital vehicle to carry a two- member crew into a low-Earth orbit (LEO) has already begun. ISRO sources said the flight is likely to be in 2016. Government had allocated 950 million (US \...


6

I'm shamelessly clutching the straw given by Major Stackings (who considers titanium to be a precious metal) and present the results of Mars Odyssey's survey with Gamma Ray Spectrometer (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04257) This is the map of relative abundance of Thorium. The truth is, any metal should be considered precious on Mars. However,...


6

There were several such experiments conducted on the International Space Station (ISS), but perhaps most notable one is ESA's EXPOSE that includes sample trays installed outside the Columbus laboratory:          ESA's Expose-E Exposed Pallet is handed off between the Japanese robotic arm and the Station robotic arm (...


6

The data from previous missions is largely valid and technically should be usable. They can act as a very good guide to what can be expected. However, there are always issues and it always comes down to details: Ownership of the Data Valeri Palyakov is a Russian, so Russia owns the data for his mission. Russia may or may not want to release all the data ...


6

Laika was never expected to make it back alive because the Sputnik 2 capsule it was launched in didn't have any means of deorbiting. From Anatoly Zak's Russian Space Web page on Sputnik-2: As remembered by Yevgeniy Shabarov, "after placing Laika in the container and before closing the hatch, we kissed her nose and wished her bon voyage, knowing that ...


6

It was not "commissioned" in any sense; the word has been around for that purpose in scientific discourse for a very long time. See, for example: The Occultation of the Planet Mars by the Moon, Observed by Mons. Hevelius, Mr. Flamstead and Mr. Hally, Philosopical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1676. (Yes, those are the astronomers you think they are......


6

To give the desired global perspective, I surveyed grand challenges identified by NASA, Roscosmos, and ESA. 1. Human presence in space All three identified areas of growth in terms of human missions. NASA listed "Expand human presence in space" as their number one theme for space technology grand challenges in 2010. Challenges included economical ...


6

Almost certainly if a mammal would have given birth in zero gravity, it would have been mice, rats, or other similar rodents. I have found a few studies which had mice that were pregnant at launch, made it to space, and returned home before they came to term and gave birth back on Earth, with no problems being observed. A number of experiments have been done ...


5

Till now no animals have been successfully reproduced in space.In 1979 Russians carried out an experiment in space to find out whether rats can reproduce in space , in that space mission the rats showed no signs of copulation because of weightlessness in space. Then Japanese researchers artificially fertilized mouse eggs with sperm that had been stored ...


5

This might be of interest: CERN, in collaboration with the European Space Radiation Super Conducting Shield project are using advances in super conductor technology to develop a super conducting magnetic field to protect spacecraft and their occupants. The aim is to create a magnetic field 3,000 times stronger than the Earth's to protect astronauts in a ...


5

Mining lunar thorium gains you nothing. Thorium is not fissile and cannot be used to fuel a nuclear rocket, power plant, or RTG. Designs for "Thorium" nuclear power plants use thorium as a fertile material to breed fissile U-233 using the neutrons from a fission reaction fueled by fissile U-235 or U-233. You start with a fairly conventional U-235 fueled ...


5

I found the source. https://www.nasa.gov/pdf/553607main_APL_Bobby_5_27_11_DW2.pdf, slides 7 and 9. In case anyone else ever goes looking for the source of these images, I hope this post helps them.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible