8

I don't think there are any papers about it, but here's what I've gleamed from my studies on it. As you mentioned, they use information from the DOD, specifically Space-Track, or C-SPOC, or J-SPOC. They are all really the same thing... Space Track will send out updates when predicted close approaches may happen to the satellite operator. SpaceX somewhere ...


6

Almost certainly if a mammal would have given birth in zero gravity, it would have been mice, rats, or other similar rodents. I have found a few studies which had mice that were pregnant at launch, made it to space, and returned home before they came to term and gave birth back on Earth, with no problems being observed. A number of experiments have been done ...


3

No, there isn't. Each space agency (NASA, ESA, Roscosmos...) has its own databases and repositories, and even within e.g. NASA one hand doesn't always know everything about what the other hand is doing or has been doing in the past. Apart from that, there are IP and political considerations keeping an agency from publishing, to other agencies, everything it ...


2

I will say the greatest challenge to space exploration would be a way to overcome the rocket equation. https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition30/tryanny.html Basically, everything we put into space from earth is inefficient in that a incredibly vast amount of relative tonnage is wasted to overcome earth gravity. If we could stage ...


2

Not yet, but Mars 2020 will. Scott Manley did a video on the subject, starting somewhere around here. Basically Mars 2020 will fire lasers at something, listening to the sounds it makes and that can tell it something about the composition of the surface. You can read more about that on NASA's website.


1

For solar astronomy, this is already being done. The STEREO spacecraft for instance are in the same orbit as Earth, but one's ahead of Earth and the other one behind Earth so they can study the Sun from different angles. For radio astronomy, interferometry is a useful tool, but if you're going to launch a radio telescope you might as well position it ...


1

I know it isn't much, and it's in German, but there is a brief mention of work on the ISS here. The transcript reads "Later, Alexander Gerst finally gets the smelter working. Here, new materials are optimized in that two metals are melted together in weightlessness, and these alloys will be used, for instance, to make vanes for jet engines." It would be ...


1

Way more autonomous/context aware robotic space crafts which have more intelligent built-in procedures. Space mining, processing and in-situ manufacturing of at least parts of space crafts, water, fuel and supporting infrastructure. Getting first high res images of exoplanets, for a example with advanced quantum interferometry combined with Earth's or Sun's ...


1

In the Latin literature of the late Middle Ages I have found a very interesting development of the use of the word "occultatio", away from a rhetorical one towards one involving light and darkness. Originally, occultatio means "the act of putting away or of hiding something". One finds it most often in the sense of "hiding a truth" or of "hiding oneself" (...


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