41

More or less. While the ISS is below the satellites use for TV transmissions, it is passing by so fast that the coverage will be highly intermittent, meaning that you would be able to watch a channel for only a couple of minutes, have black outs over the oceans, and repeat. Other notable differences would be: Normal satellites receiver are "fixed": The ...


16

@Antzi's answer is right, but I'll add some context as a supplement. While Doppler (mentioned there) might or might not be an issue for an off-the-shelf commercial satellite TV box (I don't know) it could probably be fixed with a mod that NASA could easily manage. Several answers to Do astronauts get Netflix on ISS? indicate that there is access to "new ...


7

Can the ISS get the new digital air TV or satellite TV... As far as Digital over the air TV is concerned, it's the same as old-fashioned TV in that both are transmitted from terrestrial transmitters. Different signals (digital vs analog) and different frequencies, but that's not the point here. Terrestrial TV is intended to serve a local area around the ...


6

Apollo 11 retro reflector was placed on the Moon on 21 July 1969, the first successful use of the reflector was on August 1 and 3 by the Lick Observatory. Returns were observed on August 20, September 3, September 4, and September 22, 1969, at the Mc­Donald Observatory. Attempts were made almost immediately but there was only a brief time available before ...


5

The final impact velocity of Beresheet with the lunar surface has been estimated as around 1000 meters per second, comparable to the muzzle velocity of a rifle bullet. While the impact was glancing, it's still likely that the lander smashed into tiny pieces as soon as it touched the surface. However, if the retroreflector array (or even any of its ...


5

It apparently is possible to watch TV on the ISS. Here is a picture of three astronauts aboard the ISS watching a live transmission of a football game from the FIFA world cup in 2014: You might notice that they are watching it on a notebook, so it appears to be an Internet live stream, not a satellite broadcast.


4

D.A. Arnold "Optical and Infrared Transfer Function of the Lageos Retroreflector Array", 1978, NGR 09-015-002 (P179) confirms that they're for infrared measurements, and adds some interesting info: The infrared array carried by the Lageos satellite was designed to provide coverage from any direction of illumination with a minimum of interference between ...


3

Because it's bigger? Otherwise seems to be a standard corner reflector. Upon googling I came across this which gives a good description of the differences between the original and TNG reflectors. According to Forbes, The most important innovation consists of changing from a panel of small cube corner retroreflectors (CCRs) to a single large CCR. The NGLR’...


3

The first use of LIDAR to measure the distance to the moon was in 1962, around seven years before Apollo 11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_Laser_Ranging_experiment#Overview http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/2004ESASP.561....3F The retroreflector arrays left by Apollo 11 and by other lunar missions only made it easier to detect the return pulses.


3

That is definitely the Laser Retro Reflector (LRR). They are used to provide very precise ranging information. The Sentinel 3 LRR is a hemisphere of 7 corner cube reflectors on the Earth-facing side of the satellite to allow ground stations to get ranging data accurate down to millimeters, by shining lasers at the satellite and measuring the round trip time ...


3

LightSail 1 7 cubes: 4 X 10mm diameter + 3 X 12.5mm diameter https://ilrs.cddis.eosdis.nasa.gov/docs/2014/Appendix_forILRS_Form_20141217.pdf LightSail 2 On LightSail 2, they added more corner cube reflectors in addition to the ones on the +Z end that you linked above, and standardized all of them. The second iteration has 13 cubes in total, all of which ...


2

This is an answer to "what ground station are they planning to use": Tracking LightSail 2 will be done by International Laser Ranging Service, or ILRS. The ILRS consists of about 40 laser ranging observatories around the world. There's no single overseer or funding body; many government entities contribute to the network for the good of everyone ...


1

Probably not. As mentioned in the comment by @OrganicMarble, Schiaparelli fell without propulsion or parachutes for several kilometers and left a "crater" or at least a significant depression in the Martial soil, possibly accompanied by an explosion of the unused propellant. Even individual corner reflectors - if separated - would probably be covered by ...


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