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23 votes
Accepted

Which regulatory agency (if any) is in charge of investigating civilian rocket anomalies?

FAA again. They license all commercial launches, and are responsible for investigating. The FAA has officially grounded New Shepard, pending review. They will also oversee the investigation. ...
  • 119k
17 votes

Which regulatory agency (if any) is in charge of investigating civilian rocket anomalies?

NTSB and FAA share responsibility You have great timing! Five days ago, FAA and NTSB signed an agreement on this exact issue. You can read the full text of the agreement here (PDF) and the NTSB's ...
11 votes
Accepted

Resources for Rocket Propulsion

A good starting point would be this very site's rather comprehensive reference section, which contains many propulsion references: Resources and references on the topic of space exploration If you are ...
9 votes
Accepted

Would ejecting propellant close to light speed result a '"dream engine"?

Yes, your conclusion is right, and no, your argument is wrong. If the problem to generate enough electric power is solved, then (near-)lightspeed exhaust velocity is the way to go. Arguing with ...
  • 13.5k
7 votes

What color would the exhaust of an antimatter rocket be?

As noted in the comments - there may be nothing to see. If your magic antimatter rocket is just slapping matter and anti matter together and defeating physics to get all the resulting products ...
7 votes

What is the likelihood of being able to see the Artemis exhaust plume from St. Augustine Beach, Florida?

The Space Launch System SLS uses the rocket engines and the solid fuel boosters of the Shuttle. The solid fuel boosters are known for their very intensive bright plume. So if you saw the Shuttle plume ...
  • 47.7k
5 votes
Accepted

Which orbital class rocket has highest TWR at liftoff?

Seems like JAXA's SS-520 with launch mass of 2,600 kg and 14,600 kgF average thrust would have TWR of about 5.6 data found here
  • 52.9k
4 votes

Which orbital class rocket has highest TWR at liftoff?

I took the data from the JSR Launch Vehicle Database, available here. This includes take-off thrust and launch mass, so the Thrust-to-Weight Ratio was easily calculated. Unfortunately this list also ...
  • 1,056
3 votes

What is the exhaust temperature of a liquid oxygen + liquid hydrogen vacuum engine?

In the 1990s there was an effort to produce diagnostic equipment that monitored the Space Shuttle Main Engine plume to look for early signs of engine degradation (i.e., see if the system was starting ...
2 votes
Accepted

Are the Raptor engines too numerous and close together on Booster 7?

Is it possible the inner rings of Raptors may overheat before MECO? Yes. Possible. A more interesting question is “what will happen then?” If a few engines are shut down, no problem. But if an inner ...
  • 7,573
2 votes

What is the likelihood of being able to see the Artemis exhaust plume from St. Augustine Beach, Florida?

I live in Merritt Island, Home of the Kennedy Space Center, and have watched hundreds of launches over the past 34 years -- from all over Florida and the Bahamas (many while airborne). You will ...
2 votes
Accepted

Question Deriving Mass Flow Rates for an Engine

Looking at the page you linked - and what a dreadful mishmash of units that page is - the "Specific Impulse" is given as a velocity in m/sec. To calculate what I normally think of as Isp, ...
1 vote

Resources for Rocket Propulsion

Everyday Astronaut has a playlist called Rocket Deep Dives that might interest you. Since you’re a mechanical engineer, “Why don’t rocket engines melt?” and “Rocket engine cycles” would be very good ...
  • 1,209
1 vote

Are the Raptor engines too numerous and close together on Booster 7?

There is a qualitative way to find maximum or minimum of the sum of two functions. The rule of thumb is that the max (or min) is where the two functions are equal. We assume the risk of mission loss ...
  • 7,573

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