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29

Salyut 7 had a active cooling system as well. The heat exchangers are the large white panels, perpendicular to the solar panels, to be seen in photographs of the station. This is necessary on all space stations in active mode as the energy produced by solar panels (apparently 4.5 kW in case of Salyut 7, an order of magnitude more in case of the ISS) needs to ...


9

For the US space program, it started in Skylab. Vacuuming of the Orbital Workshop mixing chamber screen, the waste management compartment screen, and other environmental control system screens was performed on an as-needed basis, usually about every other day. Screens with large mesh did not require vacuuming since most of the debris passed through them. ...


9

A space station must expel the heat from its electronics. This heat can be considerable, which usually requires large radiators. If the station is dead, then the heat is expelled, without having the heat from the electronics to power it. Also, Salyut 7 was designed to have constant hot water available for the astronauts. The heat from this needed to be ...


9

Descriptions for Salyut 1 through to Salyut 7 describe 20 portholes. At least 2 were on the transfer compartment (for Mir, at least 7 between Salyut 3-6). The rest seemed distributed in the floors and ceilings, usually either covered with a door or were for instruments. 7 differed in having 2 port holes for UV radiation, extra large window for astronomy, 2 ...


8

It does seem that Lebedev and his crewmate Anatoliy Berezovoy did indeed suntan on Salyut-7. The NASA report references a column in 'Pravda', which published excerpts from the published diary of Lebedev, "Моё измерение: дневник космонавта", or "My dimension: a cosmonaut's diary". While it is hard to find the newspaper, the book can be ...


8

The Kristall (crystal) module of Mir carried a number of payloads for carrying out metallurgy and crystal growth experiments and was dubbed a factory in Soviet Press, as it was supposed to manufacture semiconductor samples for Soviet industries. The instruments abroad Kristall included, Krater-V electrical furnace- for producing perfect gallium arsenide and ...


7

This is an artistic exaggeration. Hyperbole. Salvation of the Salyut-7 station: the cosmonaut Savinykh revealed the details of the feat The peak moment came when everything began to melt at positive temperature. The regeneration system did not work for two weeks. Plus, a person releases about 800 grams of water through the pores per day. As a result, the ...


5

An answer of two parts, part one: From what I have seen, http://www.hightechscience.org/toru.htm is the only site to include Salyut in the list of stations with TORU installed on it. And I do believe it is erroneous. I read a really long time ago, and unfortunately cannot remember where I read it, but it pretty much covered the same as the comment posted and ...


5

Your assumption would be true for a simple, dumb system that is directly powered from its solar panels, but in a complex system like a space station there are several complications. First, we don't have evidence that the solar panels actually pointed towards Sun for any extended amount of time. For all we know, the station rotated along its long axis, so it ...


5

Salyut 3 is the only publicly acknowledged space to space weapon that has been orbited. It's possible that there are others which have been deployed in secret. The outer space treaty does not prohibit the deployment of conventional weapons in space, there doesn't seem to be any hurry to do it though, which is a good thing.


4

I have a (probably exhaustive) list of every smelting experiments that where done on the space stations (Sayult 5-7; mir) I could post it but it would take time to compile (There was many experiments from different countries; including USA, Cuba, and Europeans). Many of them where simple alloys. The idea was to study the whole process. Some of the ...


3

The choice of an inclination of 51.7° for Salyut 6 (and all other space stations with Russian contribution) is straight forward: It's the lowest inclination that can be reached from Baikonur without crossing the border of China during launch. The low inclination allows for the largest possible payloads due to the additional boost from Earth rotation. All ...


3

Space to Space weapons seemed like a good idea, but really isn't that great for orbiting spacecraft. First of all, what is the use case? It would only really work for spacecraft in a similar orbit. Let's imagine that a spacecraft is coming towards you. Firing weapons to destroy the spacecraft might lead to an impact in the firing spacecraft, destroying it. ...


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