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Some key points to consider: The longer you are applying thrust against gravity, the more fuel you require. An orbit is an orbit; low-Earth orbits, the Moon's path around Earth (or more correctly, the Earth-Moon barycenter), and even Earth-Moon or Moon-Earth transfers are all orbits, and arguably all Earth orbits. Earth-Moon transfer is a special case ...


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This paper by Dan Adamo states that their fate is unknown. Other Apollo Program hardware certainly accompanied some of the components cited here into interplanetary space. Unfortunately, there are no empirical data relating to these objects' trajectories. Likely the largest such undocumented disposed components are four spacecraft/LM adapter (...


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The four pieces of the SLA fairing would follow a similar path as the third stage S-IVB of the Saturn V. The SLA pieces were separated by explosive devices only, so their additional acceleration was very, very small. See apollomaniacs. After Wikipedia, the S-IVB stages of the missions 8 to 12 are in heliocentric orbits now and of the missions 13 to 17 were ...


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I've been refining a general rocket launch simulation program over the last few years, modeling it on the work described here by Robert Braeunig. According to my current version of the simulation, it's possible to launch 134,000kg of payload (including fairing mass) to a 185 km x 200 km orbit at 28.5º inclination on the INT-21, in addition to the nearly-...


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