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3

Maybe not directly related to the question, anyway this site allows calculating "what time it is" in a specific location on the Moon: http://win98.altervista.org/space/exploration/moon/moontime.html In this page, the moon day duration (29.53 days) is divided into 24 moon-hours; when sunrise terminator reaches specified point, local time will be 06:00; when ...


8

This may belong to Astronomy SE, but the $29.5$ Earth day figure, or more accurately the time in the third reference, is what you should be planning on when you or at least your instruments go to the Moon. This represents the actual cycle between daylight and darkness, the solar day. When one clicks on the references cited in the question, the first and ...


2

This applies to the HLS elements as well, but NASA has recently been requiring Firm Fixed Price Contracts (To avoid ballooning costs, like on SLS) alongside the result of the contract being NASA purchasing a ~service~. They are essentially buying a ticket to the moon, or a ticket to a certain amount of power around the moon, but not buying the plane. They ...


1

An abstract for the "An Overview of the Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover (VIPER) Mission" talk, scheduled to be given in December at AGU, states VIPER is a solar and battery powered rover mission designed to operate over multiple lunar days, traversing several kilometers as it continuously monitors for subsurface hydrogen and other surface ...


3

It's not practical. Energy density of cosmic rays: 1.8 eV/cm3, about 10-13 J/m3. Energy density of the Sun on Earth: 103 J/m3, or 16 orders of magnitude more.


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