18

There have been a few purely solid-fuel orbital rockets over the years. The first was the Scout from 1961; the only ones in current use are the Long March 11 and the Minotaur/Minotaur-C family. There are more "nearly-pure" solid-fuel rockets such as the Shavit-2. These use three or more solid-fuel stages to get into an orbit, and then a liquid-...


10

The SS-520 is a solid fuel rocket and is described in detail in my answer to Do launchers using only solid propellant exist? SS-520-5 has put the Tricom cubesat into orbit, therefore it also qualifies as a "completely solid fuelled orbital rocket". The second attempt at becoming the smallest orbital launching rocket was made on 3 February 2018. ...


10

Increasing Propellant Mean Bulk Temperature (PMBT) increases the burn rate which increases the thrust and causes the motor to burn out sooner. The opposite is true for decreasing PMBT. This graph from Sutton, 4th edition, shows the effect for large changes in PMBT. I don't have numbers for Isp but I doubt it affects it much, because both thrust and mass ...


8

I can't say how all-solid launchers compare cost-wise with liquid or mixed launchers, but they're viable. The Minotaur I and Minotaur IV rockets are all-solid, four-stage orbital launchers. The R&D and production costs for the Minotaurs were offset to some degree by the use of converted ICBMs. The Vega rocket is a 4-stage orbital launcher with solid ...


8

It's been tried at least once at the research level, as the paper Flight Research of an Aerospike Nozzle Using High Power Solid Rockets details. A comparison was made between conventional and aerospike nozzles on a small solid fueled rocket. The rocket with the conventional nozzle performed better; it had less base drag and better performance. Even though ...


6

Radial burn is usually preferred. Axial burn rockets (solid rockets that burn from the bottom up – otherwise known as end burners) suffer from the problem that the centre of gravity of the rocket changes as the rocket burns. Radial burn rockets do not tend to suffer from this problem as they mostly burn from the inside out along the length of the rocket. The ...


6

ISAS, now a part of JAXA, has a long history of using solid fuel to launch scientific satellites. Eight different vehicles, not including the SS-520.


6

Short answer is mixing aerospike and solid fuel is probably not particularly useful The possible advantage of the mass and complexity of an aerospike is efficient operation from sea level to vacuum, useful in a hyperthetical single stage to orbit or space plane design. It is also normally assumed the complexity/cost is recovered by making them re-usable. ...


6

I have worked at the Space Center for 21 years and actually went by this Delta spin test facility today. It is located across the street from the new Eastern Processing facility (EPF) and has been renovated for future use. The book “Go for Launch” by Joe Powell1 gives some detail of the incident to include photos of the burned out interior of the high bay. ...


4

Solid rockets have very high "density specific impulse," that is, they produce a lot of thrust per unit volume, so an equivalent liquid stage of the same diameter would be somewhat longer, but not prohibitively so. There are a few extant liquid-propellant engines that produce similar thrust to the Vega first stage that could be used. The hydrogen-...


2

The high-thrust limit for a solid rocket engine would be something resembling an explosively formed projectile. This is obviously not something you can equal with a rocket feeding liquid propellant from tanks. Of course, it's also not something you'd realistically use for orbital launch...you'd be compromising its functionality as a rocket to give you more ...


2

The ISRO had two fully solid fuelled launch systems called the Satellite Launch Vehicle ( SLV ) and Augmented Satellite Launch Vehicle ( ASLV ). SLV was a four stage launch vehicle with a payload capacity of 40kg to LEO and ASLV was 5 stage with 150kg to LEO. Both launch vehicles were considered as experimental and never intended to have a long service life. ...


1

Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) had a set of specification limits and a set of certified use limits on Propellant Mean Bulk Temperature The specification limits were 40°F to 90°F. The certification limits were 50°F to 82°F. From NSTS 07700 VOLUME X – BOOK 1 (November 1998) Flight and Ground System Specification, Book 1, Requirements The following ...


1

"Other things remaining the same" is typically not true for chemical rocket fuels. Nevertheless, the asymptotic relationship between calorific value and specific impulse is that the Isp is proportional to the square root of the energy content. This is because Isp is directly proportional to exhaust velocity, which squared is proportional to the ...


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