18

Very unlikely. The first launch of a satellite in space, Sputnik, was launched without any prior public announcement. The US knew about it 7 months before the launch happened. It is pretty inconceivable that a launch could have happened that we wouldn't have had any knowledge of beforehand. The linked CIA papers even predicted the launch date to within a 2 ...


15

In latter part of the 1960s it would depend on any nation having developed over the horizon radar (OTHR) capabilities that could provide significant coverage of its opponents launch sites. Australian research into HF radar IN the 1960s made some useful discoveries. One was that a rocket departing the atmosphere produced a very large and easily detected ...


11

Not a heat shield, but rather a steel-mesh parachute of sorts. From This New Ocean: ...the contractor team of Avco and Convair, which, since the Sputniks, had spent more time and money on manned satellite design than other industrial firms, presented to the Air Force a highly detailed proposal for development of a "minimum" vehicle. Featuring the &...


11

Given the tendency of early missiles and rockets to blow up, it was normal for them to transmit telemetry to ground stations. Since they were at high altitude careful receiver design could allow this to be captured outside national borders and is potentially very valuable in determining system capabilities. From the late 1950s the US was spending substantial ...


5

Continuing to Mars was actually considered. Before the first moon landing, President Nixon ordered a study of the U.S. space program. It recommended sending men to Mars and the other planets: Early in 1969 the new President appointed a Space Task Group to study the space program, calling for a report in six months on alternatives for the post-Apollo ...


3

Western propaganda simply painted the race as over. The soviets went on to launch space station after space station throughout the 70s and 80s, gaining thousands of man-hours of low earth orbit experience while the US barely got skylab to work. By the time the joint construction of ISS started in the 90s, the soviets/russians had spent 6336 days manning ...


3

To be completely honest, I don't think saying that one side "won" the Space Race is entirely correct. More to the point of the question: it did not "end" at Moon per se, but just slowly ramped down. The support that NASA had in the initial stages of the space race was there because of the political reasoning - USSR put the first satellite ...


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