New answers tagged

1

Found a reliable answer in the pages of "GNC ASC 2102 Ascent Guidance, Navigation, and Flight Control Workbook" from May 15, 1979. The order of the rotation angles depends on the frame chosen. For LVLH, it is yaw-pitch-roll, which would in fact put the shuttle's body frame in gimbal lock while on the pad, as it would then be at a pitch of 90 ...


3

The LVLH can be realized using the position and velocity vectors in the ECI frame. Other treatments are possible, but they would involve transformation of the vectors to the right frame. Conversion from ECI seems the most straightfoward, and aligned with the definition you provide above! Assume the following notation for the LVLH axes vectors, expressed in ...


0

Today I stumbled across the whole document - including the appendix I was missing -posted on this NASA website "Space Shuttle Recordation". Although many of the drawings appear to have been extracted from the Shuttle Crew Operations Manual, there is still some useful new information.


8

This is from the STS-127 Flight Requirements Document. I added the arrow.


2

A thruster is overexpanded if the nozzle exhaust pressure is less than ambient pressure, ambient if the nozzle exhaust pressure equals ambient pressure, or underexpanded if the nozzle exhaust pressure is greater than ambient pressure. Since ambient pressure is essentially zero in vacuum, any thruster operating in vacuum is by definition an underexpanded ...


7

No. As mentioned by @GremlinWrangler in a comment, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engines could not be fired below 70,000 ft (21 km) altitude. The minimum altitude for an OMS engine burn is 70,000 feet. Below this altitude, the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the OMS engine nozzle could cause it to collapse. Source: Orbital ...


2

Combining a couple comments into an answer -- community wiki as none of this is my contribution. Per user OrganicMarble, who worked in training for the shuttle: The words 'ionosphere' or 'charging' don't appear in the Shuttle Crew Training Catalog. The phrase 'space weather' appears once, in the description of a class the crew got on the Tissue Equivalent ...


8

Building on the information found in my answer to this question (which answers part of the question above "Is there a listing of which SSMEs are planned for each Artemis flight" and gives this image) Where are the lost RS-25D Block 2 engines? the history of the 4 engines on the first SLS booster is Engine / Shuttle Missions 2060: 127, 131, 135 ...


1

Mesosphere stretches roughly from Kármán line (air pressure 0.0000003atm) down to about 50km altitude (air pressure: 0.001 atm) - in technology these amounts of air are typically thought of as "vacuum". That means even despite the hypersonic speed, the lift generated by such minuscule amounts of air is very low. Additionally, it flew at an ...


-4

From an "agricultural" (i.e. using words that even I can understand) point of view: I'm a long-time long-distance motorcyclist. People ask me why I check my tire pressures so often during a long trip. Here's how I explain that: "Let's say I top off my tires in western CO, up to their recommended pressures. A few days later, I find myself in ...


10

Absolutely not. Besides the minor issue that the shuttle is retired and no longer flyable, its aerodynamic performance during the descent and landing phase is dependent on the density of Earth's atmosphere. Mars' atmosphere is about 1/100 as dense, so the shuttle won't have the lift or controllability that it needs to land.


4

Shuttle: The cockpit display indications for separation events were rather subtle. This is presumably because visual/physiological cues were available. Some fields on the computer displays changed and lights flickered on and off. Details below. Solid Rocket Booster Separation Cockpit Cues Shortly before separation a flashing indication "PC < 50&...


3

It is unlikely that gimbal checks would be done on a running engine (at least in flight) due to the resultant effects on the vehicle. Shuttle: In addition to the famous prelaunch gimbal test of the main engines prior to launch as described here, gimbal checks were also done on the Orbital Maneuvering Engines (OMEs) and the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) thrust ...


2

According to the Galileo Wikipedia article under Reconsideration-Paragraph 6 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_(spacecraft)#Reconsideration), there was consideration that Galileo could of been launched by a Air Force Titan IV-Centaur G in May 1991, but the AirForce could not provide NASA a Titan rocket due to the backlog of Department of Defense Payload....


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