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Are there any statements from astronauts with Apollo and Shuttle experience about vibrations and noise in comparison? John Young: Q: How did the launch compare to the Saturn V? JY: "It didn't shake near as bad but there were a little more Gs [forces of gravity] — 1.2 Gs on the Saturn V, 1.5 Gs at liftoff on the shuttle. We only got up to 3 Gs, well, ...


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Partial answer (to What is the maximum apogee a Space Shuttle (and which one of the five space-flying Shuttles?) ever reached ) The maximum altitude reached by a shuttle orbiter on an unclassified1 mission was on STS-82 (Discovery) after the 3rd reboost of Hubble. This resulted in a 335.1 X 321.0 NM orbit. (620.6 x 594 km) 1 Published orbits for the ...


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The highest orbit the Space Shuttle was designed to achieve was 643 km. Theoretically one could do a more elliptical orbit, 200 km by 1000 km or so, although I suspect there would be some thermal problems, and it might be too difficult to reenter. This comes from taking the designed max and mostly splitting the difference between apogee and perigee. In any ...


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I will use a series of images of the Earth taken by the Apollo 11 crew during the flight to the Moon. I use the formulas developed by tfb to determine the percentage of the visible Earth. Image AS11-36-5325 from a distance of 18,700 km showing 37.3 % using a 80 mm lens Image AS11-36-5330 from a distance of 87,000 km showing 46.6 % using a 80 mm lens Image ...


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This is not an answer as such, but an attempt to provide the mathematical apparatus you need to think about this (and it was way too long for a comment). There are two sensible things that might be meant by 'seeing the entire Earth': one is that the Earth would be visible in the field of view of a human eye; the other is that you can see a given amount of ...


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That's STS-134, the final mission of Endeavour. There is a higher quality video here but sadly it cuts away just as the vehicle enters the cloud deck. Lots of cool ascent video here from that mission but a quick skim didn't show the cloud deck penetration. There's a cool shot from the Shuttle ...


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First let's review the nominal operation of the Shuttle Waste Collection System (WCS). (from Shuttle Crew Operations Manual (SCOM) page 2.25-2) It was divided into two major systems, one for urine and one for feces. The urinal consisted of a hose with a crewperson's personal funnel attached at the business end and fan/separator units at the other. The fan ...


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