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Space motion sickness: incidence, etiology, and countermeasures (Martina Heer, William Paloski. Autonomic Neuroscience Vol.129, no.1-2, 2006. Pp. 77-79): Space motion sickness is experienced by 60% to 80% of space travelers during their first 2 to 3 days in microgravity and by a similar proportion during their first few days after return to Earth. Since $...


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Well, there are probably several body motions that can exacerbate SAS. Anecdotally, I can tell you that it was well understood by Shuttle flight crew that the act of doffing the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) (which usually occurred within a few hours of orbital insertion) was considered especially provocative with respect to the SAS problem. This was ...


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To answer your question, Yes, almost everyone has motion sickness in zero gravity. Your question has bits that are correct. Humans rely on the vestibular system for balance and attitude, and with the lack of gravity the fluids don't move correctly. But they do still move, because inertia doesn't go away. So if you turn your head the fluid will try to ...


5

Long time, no answer, so I'll take a stab at it...please be aware that all of my "evidence," while purely anecdotal, is first hand. I never heard the subject term, "lead head" used in this context (I was in The Office from 1996-2004, inclusive). It was frequently said, however, that, "You pay going up, or you pay coming back, nobody flies in Space for free."...


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I just went to an astronaut talk (Mark Polansky). The action of talking off the ACES suit neck ring was what exacerbated the sickness. The interior of the suit, like other pressure suits, is a rubbery material. Quoting him directly, “it felt like being born again”. Think of the feeling of taking off a tight, sweaty shirt over your head, then make it five ...


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No. The prelaunch timeline for the crew was closely scheduled. Shuttle crews were awakened ~ 5 hours prior to the scheduled liftoff time and ate a meal shortly after they woke up and got dressed. Depending on the scheduled liftoff time, the crew may have been sleep shifting for a week or so prior to launch day. Source - SCOM, page 5.1-1 Normal Procedures ...


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Yes. They have little in common, beyond both resulting in a mismatch between vestibular data input to the brain and what’s actually going on, resulting in symptoms that impair performance. In SAS, our best theory is that the shift from 1G to microgravity environment essentially results in a dropoff from baseline vestibular input that the brain seeks to ...


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I don't consider this answer to be definitive, but it's most likely the best we will do here... I remember hearing some stories around NASA's Astronaut Office, probably in the ~1998 time frame, about STS-51-D (Jake Garn's flight - which happened in April, 1985). The running joke, at the time, was that the second-highest Garn level ever achieved, to that ...


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