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How do spacecraft reach Lagrange points? First things first: Spacecraft don't go to the various Lagrange points of interest. They instead go into pseudo orbits about those Lagrange points. How do spacecraft reach Lagrange points? Either fuel efficiently, but slowly, or by brute force. Consider the Earth-Moon Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) that are ...


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Supplemental answer to @Schwern's answer The GIF below shows SOHO traveling out to it's halo orbit around Sun-Earth L1. JWST will do something that looks similar, but towards Sun-Earth L2. Why does the trajectory nicely dovetail into the halo orbit? This is really interesting. If you first put the spacecraft in its halo orbit, but just a tiny bit too close ...


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As I understand, to reach a Lagrange point the spacecraft would need to slow down. If it's launched from the Earth it does not need to use propellant to slow down. NASA explains this in its article about the James Webb Space Telescope which will orbit the Earth-Moon L2 point. It will take roughly 30 days for Webb to reach the start of its orbit at L2, but ...


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