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1

It's the individual atoms of gold that absorb blue light. Adding gold to any metal will rob some of its ability to reflect blue light. Gold already has roughly a 35% reflectivity in the blue and near UV so it is likely that you can bring that up higher by alloying with another metal. I'm not sure if aluminum would be a good choice or if a more soluble metal ...


3

The CHEOPS Red Book talks about this in a couple ways. Section 3.2 "Sky Coverage" (in the context of science requirements) says: SciReq 2.1 Transit search on stars with small planets (L1) 50% of the whole sky shall be accessible for 50 (goal: 60) cumulative (goal: consecutive) days of observations per year and per target with observation duration ...


2

Cheops is in a circular orbit with an inclination of 98° and a height of 700 km. Measurements are taken by observing the same spot of the sky for 48 hours while orbiting Earth about 30 times. It's obvious that the camera must be pointed sideways, because in any other position Earth will obstruct the view at some point during the orbit. The camera doesn't ...


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