23

Spacecraft rely on information from earth to avoid space debris, they don't have instruments for scanning and detecting debris. There's a few reasons for this: Power: most spacecraft don't have enough electrical power to run a radar powerful enough to detect small debris far enough away to matter Weight: in order to be useful for detecting debris the radar ...


13

Let me tell you how a typical satellite avoids debris, which I believe will answer your question about how Soyuz does it. All space objects are tracked by a US military organization called JSPOC. They also release data to those operating satellites via https://www.space-track.org/ . Note that they will not release information about US classified payloads ...


6

First of all, it was a miss. Whew! The close approach predicted at 21:53:00 UTC on 7 Jan 2017 has passed without incident. The JSpOC has confirmed that both satellites are being tracked as single objects, indicating that no collision has occurred. A few tidbits that might help narrow it down: The percentage is very high, which means the objects must be ...


5

Talking about India It has one DSN station with S/X band support with 11,18 and 32m antennas. As earlier answer marked, except for time critical tracking and control operations, data set collected over series of passes or a larger time interval can suffice orbit determination needs. During critical mission phases of important missions like MOM, ISRO does ...


4

These are so called "Analyst" objects: Analyst objects are on-orbit objects that are tracked by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) with insufficient fidelity for publication in the public satellite catalog (SATCAT). The lack of fidelity may be due to infrequent tracking, cross-tagging (observation association with closely-spaced objects), ...


3

Yes and Yes! The 18th SPCS (f.n.a "JSpOC") is a Part of the former "Air Force Space Command" (Wikipedia 18 Space Control Squadron). The AFSpC on the other hand became the "US Space Force" (AFSpC Website) Because the establishment of the US Space Force just happend only some months ago, plenty of sources and Wikipedia-Sites are outdated saying 18th SPCS is ...


3

It is going to be difficult to find precise data during the initial launch, however let's see what might be available: For SpaceX launches, their videos posted in their YouTube channel display altitude and speed, as well as visualizations of their orbits and their projected ground-track across Earth's geography. Their press releases contain additional ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible