39

A controller on Earth, Ed Fendell, manually operated the camera by radio control, knowing the time of liftoff and the ascent trajectory expected and referring to a time-and-angle chart without watching the video feed in real time! According to Fendell: Now, the way that worked was this. Harley Weyer, who worked for me, sat down and figured what the ...


36

A caveat about this answer: it's not about SpaceX directly, more about the use of self-inspection cameras in general across space and launch vehicles. It is used for engineering and status information. "Selfie" footage has been standard (at least on launch vehicles) since Apollo. Telemetry offers a very limited view of things and is prone to ...


15

There is value added. I was an operator of a satellite that had a video of the satellite being deployed. We were able to see from the video that the deployment was clean. I assume if nothing goes wrong, the only value is PR, but if something does go wrong, video can help considerably. EDIT: This kind of thing is exactly what might be useful from the ZUMA ...


9

As far as I can tell, Huygens would not have been able to take a picture of Cassini. Huygen's camera was part of the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer instrument package. As seen in this cutaway from GSFC, the DISR port is on the side of the spacecraft. This port would have been entirely covered by the heat shield. Therefore, the very design of Huygens ...


7

I think a short answer would be yes, but with caveats. Many GoPros have been flown on high-altitude balloons to near-space and in close to vacuum conditions, using completely COTS assemblies (and therefore internal batteries). GoPros also work on the ground in vacuum chambers. At about 02:40: Alright guys, so the ...


6

The cameras of Voyager had a resolution of 800 by 800 pixels, see. There are 8 bits per pixel. One with a 1500 mm telescope with a (horizontal and vertical) field of view of 0.424 degree (25.44 arcminutes) and a theoretical resolution of 1.18 arcseconds. The pixel resolution was 1.908 arcseconds. At the closest approach of Voyager 2 to Jupiter (570,000 km), ...


4

The cameras are just in a pressurized, "factory-sealed" box. The encoder, cameras, and other electronics are enclosed in a box pressurized to approximately one atmosphere, containing dry nitrogen, to provide a level of protection to the electronics from the space environment. Source The pressurized box is mounted on the Columbus module External ...


4

The Closed Circuit TV (CCTV) cameras in the Space Shuttle Payload bay had optical zoom lenses. Zoom capability magnifies or reduces the size of objects in a camera's field of view by adjusting the focal length of the lens. The minimum focus for standard lenses is 3 feet, the maximum is infinity. (emphasis mine, reference) (personal photo of camera ...


4

The video camera on the Apollo LRV had zoom, used in the well-known Apollo 17 liftoff footage.


4

MarCO features two cameras, both with 752 x 480 pixel resolution. They are located on opposite sides of the CubeSat. One camera, a "color wide-field engineering camera" is mounted with the primary purpose of confirming deployment of the high-gain antenna. In order to do this it is mounted on the large side of the cube looking "up and out" at the antenna....


3

Each MarCO is equipped with two cameras. Both are 752x480 resolution, and connected to independent capture and processing computers. The narrow field-of-view camera is aligned with the UHF antenna, so it will face Mars during EDL (Entry, Descent, Landing). The wide field-of-view camera is aligned with the high gain antenna, allowing it to verify deployment ...


3

Pretty sure that it is the "Inory Eye" camera as mentioned in the Planetary Society piece: However, the Longjiang-2 transceiver also carried an onboard student-developed camera, dubbed the Inory Eye (a note on the name here) and controlled by a tiny circuit board, which has returned a string amazing images of the Earth and Moon, as well as the lunar ...


3

Generically, the challenges are the same as any other camera, on the ground, in space, or elsewhere. Specifcally for a space camera some of the issues that need to be overcome: Desired resolution - As noted in the comments above, resolution is limited by a combination of the optics and the sensor (CCD/CMOS/etc). In particular focal length, aperture size, ...


3

This isn't a complete answer, but I think there should be at least some doubt cast on this story: it's certainly not as clear as a lot of people think it is. The Wikipedia entry for this lens claims that it was developed in 1966. So we can wonder what it might have been used for. It is generally claimed that it was used (or designed) for pictures of the ...


3

There are many external cameras on the ISS. The most prominent ones are the ETVCG (External Television Camera Group) cameras. (See this question for details: What is this object outside the ISS that looks like a loudspeaker?) There are ~10 locations scattered about the ISS where ETVCGs can be located, but for many years they have been at these four ...


2

One of the primary purposes of the camera is to confirm that the high gain antenna has been deployed properly. This requires that both the flat reflector (electrically "parabolic") and the antenna feed at the parabola's focus have both been deployed from the cubesat correctly. The black item protruding is near the surface of the reflector and is tilted "...


2

I have seen pictures from CubeSats, but you are right they are hard to come by. In addition to the camera failures you allude to, there is the issue that many CubeSats (especially those with cameras) are student projects with poor followup. One other complication is that the failure to take a (nice) picture can often be due to bad attitude control, so it ...


2

The technical difficulties NASA refers to are those regarding communications (LOS) with the space station's feed and/or cameras switching. The ISS tracking stations lose contact with the space station during certain times of the orbit. Also, don't compare consumer-level electronics with those used in aerospace. Lots of factors such as temperature resistance,...


1

I think this was answered perfectly well in both the answer and the comment left by Tildal. So it would appear as an overexposed region, that might appear as pretty much anything after post-processing, including the Moiré fringed dot with typical read and blue channel interference pattern around it on the image that you noticed, once the RGB sources, or ...


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