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You have it correct but, you are looking at this very narrow choice of ISP. First the BepiColombo mission to mercury uses a Ion Thruster with a ISP of 4,200 seconds(41,202 M/s) using the same formula shows a mass ratio of 11.325. That not incudes the Nexis Ion thruster is able to get 8000 seconds (78,200 m/s) and the European DS4G innovative thruster doing ...


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No. No object can exert a torque on itself via only internal interactions. That would violate conservation of angular momentum. Spacecraft are constructed to have controlled, usually zero, magnetic fields to reduce torque from external fields they encounter.


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As mentioned already, the motion of two bodies can be reduced to a single body problem. In spaceflight, the assumption that your satellite is massless can basically always be made. The distinction is mostly whether you model the motion of your spacecraft as being attracted by one or two bodies. Of course, regardless of whether you are using a single central ...


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Partial answer: And also, is the three-body problem theory only used to solve for periodic orbits around Lagrange points or are there any other implications? The CR3BP or CRTBP or Circular Restricted Three Body Problem assumes circular orbits of two massive bodies around their common center of mass, and a third massless body that responds to their ...


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The language here tends to get in the way a bit. Generally “reaction wheels” are used for pointing: you turn them, then stop turning them once the satellite is pointing as desired. They’re not meant to spin rapidly to soak up a bunch of angular momentum. If you just need to control pointing, a reaction wheel system isn’t going to be able to absorb the ...


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