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7

I do know that the Deinococcus has the ability survive in high energy levels of radiation which is an earth bacteria. Chances are they are just trying to limit chances of something going into space alive. Anything is possible and it also would just seem careless to send earth life into space. This is especially true knowing that thermal adaptation in ...


6

There is an official Mars One FAQ page answering exactly this question: Mars One will take specific steps to ensure that the Mars environment (which we will study, and on which we will depend) will not be harmed. The Mars base will be forced to recycle just about everything, and pay close attention to its energy use and minimize the leakage of ...


5

There is actually a whole discipline, which deals with such issues (among others), in one way or another: Astrobiology. After reports of Streptococcus mitis on the Moon 1969/1970, the topic become more and more an issue of discussion. Today, there are sets of regulations on how a spacecraft, depending on its target, needs to be sterilized. This had led to ...


5

Terraforming Mars, if it turns out to be viable at all, will be a very long term project, and will start very far in the future. (We'll probably have to learn how to terraform the Earth first; we have messed up our own environment pretty badly.) Probe sterilization efforts are intended to avoid interfering with the search for current or fossil life on Mars,...


4

Once you open the hatch, Mars is contaminated. No matter how hard you try to sterilize everything before opening up, there will be microbes on the outside of suits, airlock surfaces, etc. Maybe you could flood the airlock with hot acid or some other biocide and then drain it, but that will be considered too much useless payload, and is not 100% guaranteed ...


3

It appears that most of the true sterilization actually takes place after launch. The harsh conditions of the trip there and the landing should be enough to kill off a majority of the microbes. The Mars rover projects all receive multiple sterilization treatments here on Earth before launch, typically UV treatment, but what really kills off the bacteria is ...


1

While sending organisms to do terraforming is something that can't be done yet, why is it that major space organization seems to not care, some even embracing the idea? Not everyone is of the same mind. The current planetary protection rules exist for two reasons, one practical, the other, moral. The practical reason is that should we discover life on ...


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