19

No. There was a faint, if-everything-went-right-and-they-decided-to-take-the-risk possibility of speeding up the launch of the next shuttle to rescue the crew. Probably not a realistic possibility. You can read about the things that were considered in an after-the-fact analysis in the answers to this question: What would NASA have done if they knew Columbia ...


10

Essentially each country who has agreed to send such spacecraft wants to build their own spacecraft. This is most noted in US/ Russian, but is to a lesser extend to European/ Japanese partners. Breaking them down by country, we have the following: United States Shuttle Cygnus Dragon Russia Progress Soyuz ESA ATV Japan HTV Okay, so there are 4 ...


7

On the Falcon 9 v1.0 that was used for the first 5 launches, they were down around the engine area, and required insulation and protection from the engines. In the move to Falcon 9 v1.1 and the Merlin 1D engine they moved them into the LOX tanks on both stages. This de-cluttered the engine area a great deal. COPV's are notoriously difficult to build, ...


6

At the moment, the only man-rated vehicle, in the sense you mean, is Soyuz. However, all the visiting vehicles that dock to the station have to be man-rated in a sense, since they become station extensions. Of the other currently flying vehicles, since only Dragon (cargo) can reenter without burning up (HTV, ATV, Progress, Cygnus all destruct on reentry) ...


6

The winds are believed to be relatively constant, so the speed of the outpost relative to the surface should not be a factor. If there are major wind shears at that altitude, then the outpost has other problems. In fact, landing on something that naturally moves with the wind is easier than landing on a runway that is fixed relative to the wind. A runway ...


5

According to Colonization of Venus, by Geoffrey A. Landis (2003), most resources necessary for sustaining the colonies will be accessed in situ. A permanent settlement will need access to the resources required for human life and for greenhouses to provide food and oxygen, and the atmosphere of Venus has these in abundance. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and ...


4

While @geoffc explained where they are, I'll explain why they are there. These tanks contain very high pressure helium. Helium is a very difficult gas to store, and as any gas, storing works best at low temperatures. Storing them inside a tank with already cold LOX makes it much easier to manage than storing it outside of the tank would manage. Careful ...


4

My reading of the Aviation Week article on this seemed to suggest that while Landsat-7 was not designed to be refueled, when they looked at its design, they found a fuel line, they could patch into that could be used to fill the tanks again. They need to cut away the insulation to get to the pipe, and then will probably use some variant of a vampire tap to ...


4

Diversity is good, as recent history has shown. With the failure of Cygnus, Progress, and Dragon, there is still an HTV due to launch with cargo. There is national prestige involved, and while manned spaceflight is very hard and expensive, cargo is significantly easier and cheaper. The ISS consortium agreement does a lot of horse trading and barter for ...


4

This is not done, but I couldn't find a definite reference for you. NASA has chosen not to publish recent ISS checklists. It's also hard to prove a negative, but for what it's worth, here is a fairly detailed sequence of events concerning a Cygnus departure from here. Approaching the end of its stay at ISS, the S.S. Gene Cernan was buttoned up by the ...


3

I too am an admirer of the ATV and wish it had been developed further. I remember watching the ATV-1 "Jules Verne" mission at JSC and the "Houston, there's an X-wing requesting permission to dock" jokes1. The official explanation is obsolescence of components. "If we wanted to reopen production lines, there is a significant ...


3

Source: Space Logistics Modeling and Simulation Analysis using SpaceNet: Four Application Cases A mission manifest from September 2010 through December 2015 was created using unofficial launch and mission manifests provided by Orbital, SpaceX, JAXA, and ESA, as well as extrapolating launch rates for Progress and Soyuz as of July 2010 [...] Figure ...


3

BOE: 1000 active satellites, launched with 3 tons of fuel+oxidizer each for an expected lifetime of 15 years is 3000/15=200 tons of fuel+oxidizer needed per year. Note: 3 tons is too much, as many satellites will have a total mass that's less than that. I could be an order of magnitude off. Most of these will be hypergolics so no oxygen, the remainder is ...


3

ESA and Japan are partners in the ISS venture. As such, they are supposed to contribute to the operating cost of the station. They have chosen to do this in the form of resupply flights. This gave them the opportunity to bolster their space industry by developing new technology (and by producing a pile of hardware). It also meant they could spend the several ...


3

Progress is built around the same basic design as the Soyuz, three modules. Propulsion is much the same. The Orbital module at the other end, docks to the station and has cargo the crew removes. The middle module on Progress (where the crew would normally be during launch/landing) is redone to carry fluids. Water, fuel for the station, whatever. Thus ...


2

I think we can assume the problem of landing is solved by having bases there in the first place. The NASA HAVOC suggestion has ships inflate balloons quickly after entering atmosphere, thus they float at desired altitude. Next problem is how to do this cheaply and efficiently, if anything like that can be said about space. Asteroids apparently are very ...


2

The most simplified answer I could give you is to make it as compact and light as it needs to be. To my knowledge there isn't a standard checklist for items being sent to the station, there is obviously a list of items that are allowed in space but most cargo items are picked and vetted on a case by case basis. If you can convince NASA and it's partners that ...


1

I saw a presentation by Elon Musk where he said they would be carrying cargo on the demo flight, but cannot find the reference right now.


1

I would expect that if a satellite had no special design for in-orbit propellant transfer then the initial list of options would centre around the normal ground propellant supply interface, normally referred to as a "Fill and Drain Valve", FDV. Typical characteristics of interest are: often has an internal valve that can be operated by a "...


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