71

No. Planting a flag was the idea of NASA's "Mr. Fix-It", Jack Kinzler, less than 4 months before Apollo 11's launch: Kinzler believed that the people of the United States would also want to see an American flag to commemorate the enormous achievement of landing a man on the surface of the moon. The original LM design had an American flag painted on the ...


6

Your question in its present form is unanswerable. Tensile strength is not the limiting factor of how space elevators are designed. Space elevators are designed to have an arbitrary constant amount of tension. This is accomplished by varying the thickness of the cable as you move up to either L1 or a GEO orbit for earth. Imagine it this way, when you ...


5

The final impact velocity of Beresheet with the lunar surface has been estimated as around 1000 meters per second, comparable to the muzzle velocity of a rifle bullet. While the impact was glancing, it's still likely that the lander smashed into tiny pieces as soon as it touched the surface. However, if the retroreflector array (or even any of its ...


5

“Super-isostatic” means that a region hasn’t (yet) relaxed to an isostatic configuration. On selenological spatial scales, things have a bit of resistance to reflow, although there’s a difference of opinion on how much resistance, the role of impact heating, etc (a starting point to read more is Kiefer et al 2012) More to the point, dispersing a point-like ...


3

You appear to have missed the next paragraph in the phys.org article, Roger: "When we combined that with lunar topography data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, we discovered the unexpectedly large amount of mass hundreds of miles underneath the South Pole-Aitken basin." It was the combination of the lunar gravity model from the Gravity Recovery and ...


3

The problem is you are asking for an exact value that does not exist. The biggest load on an elevator cable is the cable itself, the cable near the center needs more strength than the cable near the ends. In practice this means you would build a cable that is thicker in the middle. The greater the increase in thickness you are willing to accept the lower ...


2

Not even remotely enough delta-v to make the TLI burn. The apollo burn was 3+ km/sec. The space shuttle OMS system was good for about 300 m/sec, so about 10% of the amount needed.


2

tl;dr: The 125 mm proven receiving telescope design used on the receiving telescope of the MLA laser ranger used on MESSENGER was adapted and enlarged to 150 mm for the LOLA of LRO. I am guessing that this was felt far more prudent than a new design using reflective optics based on exotic materials like silicon carbide. This page on LOLA links to Optical ...


2

Since I am sure you're not denying the authenticity of this video, let us turn your question another way: why is the flag behaving this way ? The flag is roughly subjected to 3 forces : Its weight: 1/6 of the very same force it would have been subjected to on Earth Tension from its attached part on the rod Internal material tension due to the elasticity of ...


1

An exact value isn't available, but there are some proposed designs in existence that we can look at. The materials exist today. A breaking height of about 300 km is required. Kevlar could theoretically be used, but other materials that allow for a larger tensile strength would be preferred, such as Zylon or M5, with a total tensile strength around 4-6 GPa. ...


1

Yes it's possible, and known ... at Pluto. What are officially called the (four known) smaller moons of Pluto are actually orbiting the center of mass formed by Pluto and its large moon Charon, which is outside both Pluto and Charon. Wikipedia includes an animation of all the known moons orbiting Pluto. The small moons are all much farther away from the ...


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