8

On Mars, Curiosity has a diffractometer so in principle it should be able to measure the Bragg diffraction that is used to detect quasicrystals. However, such analysis may not have been done yet.


2

For a single impact to accelerate the moon's rotation to once per 24 hours, the impactor would have to be much larger than a comet. Imagine suspending a stone ball with piano wire and trying to get it spinning by throwing tiny pebbles at it. Even if you cover everything with velcro so the pebbles don't just bounce off, you're going to need a sizeable rock to ...


2

I think the critical question is: Exactly how do you "spin up" the Moon? You can't apply force externally to an object in space without imparting both spin and linear motion, but, like spinning a basketball on your finger, the closer to imparting force tangent to the sphere surface, the closer you come. Or, you apply to equal and opposite forces ...


2

A change in the rotation of the moon, or even a change its mass, will have no effect on its orbital parameters. That said, how you would change these things probably would change its orbit in small ways. Colliding comets into it will impart a small force which would change its orbit by a tiny amount. The type of change will depend on the angle of the ...


2

I tried to do the same using python: import numpy as np a = 1737400 x_g = -411141.107140 y_g = -411325.894877 x = x_g/np.sqrt( 1 + np.square(x_g/a) + np.square(y_g/a) ) y = y_g/np.sqrt( 1 + np.square(x_g/a) + np.square(y_g/a) ) z = a/np.sqrt( 1 + np.square(x_g/a) + np.square(y_g/a) ) print('(x, y, z) = ', (x, y, z)) x_s = 2*a*y/(a + z) y_s = 2*a*x/(...


1

To compliment Russell Borogrove's answer, a different LRO image with lighting more closely matching the ISRO image gets a ratio around 1.2 As a general rule doing any sort of measurement from space images is of limited use unless you know the details of angle the image was taken to the local vertical and if any spherical correction/distortion has already ...


1

I assume that by "crater" you mean the diameter of the crater on the right side, and by "distance" you mean the distance from the rim of the crater to the LM site. Given the complete reversal in lighting direction, which can distort the appearance of craters significantly, the compression artifacts in the second picture, and the crudeness ...


1

Reading the linked questions, answers, and references (thanks @uhoh), particularly R. Whitley and R. Martinez, 2015, Options for Staging Orbits in Cis-Lunar Space and this figure: Leads me to believe that getting to a NRHO is much like an 'Apollo-style' lunar transfer (i.e., in plane, Hohmann-ish transfer orbit). The only difference comes in targeting the ...


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