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There are a couple of potential solutions to this problem. One would be to place the mirrors at a distance just a little closer to Mars than the L2 point and let the radiation pressure counter the weak Mars net gravity field. One doesn't have to be right in line either, but a "halo" orbit circling the Mars/Sun line would allow you to balance forces while ...


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Strategically placed reflective material on Phobos on the tidally locked half facing mars. The mars moon appears one third compared to earths in the martian sky. If reflective, it would shine roughly ten times as bright as earths moon. Mars atmosphere is one hundredth thinner than earths. At that earths atmosphere cuts down on the affects of our moons ...


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In fact it could be arbitrarily low. But wait before you rejoice. The Moon has an elliptic trajectory. This elliptic motion perturbs any orbit of a satellite in LEO. If you first assume your satellite is in the same plane as the Moon and describe the system as a time dependent Hamiltonian system with two degrees of freedom, a process called Arnold diffusion ...


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