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23

A -183 C nitrogene-methane mix doesn't make you an icecube on the spot, but it still causes quickly frozen wounds. Your only way to avoid it if your whole body is protected, no $cm^2$ may remain open. You need also oxygen supply. Here comes another problem: methane with oxygen supply becomes an explosive substance. The methane concentation on the Titan's ...


22

The ESA Huygens probe very accurately characterized the conditions at its landing site on Titan's surface and verified measurements made by the Voyager 1 Radio Science (VRS) investigation nearly 25 years earlier. It measured a surface temperature of 93.8K (VRS: 94.0 ± 0.7 K), a surface pressure of 1467 mb (VRS: 1496 ±20 mb), a methane abundance of 5.65 ± 0....


13

This article suggests that the radar can penetrate the lakes and reports them to be hundreds of meters deep. The space.com article referenced seems to be sourced from a Geophysical Research Letters article from 2008 (not paywalled) which gives the radar wavelength (2.2cm) and claims that it would be absorbed in 2-20m of clean hydrocarbon, but also give other ...


7

It's a late answer but I was surprised nobody cited this: Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) The TiME lander was a part of cooperative NASA-ESA mission TSSM. The mission was not considered as highest priority by Planetary Decadal Survey 2013 so it's not being implemented now. Also it was studied as standalone Discovery class mission. ASRG generator was planned as ...


7

They plan to use some form of "site evaluation" to prevent tipping over: However, technology developments in the last two decades, notably the revolution in availability of multi- rotor drones a made possible by modern compact sensors and autopilots as well as the development of sensing and control capabilities for autonomous landing and site ...


6

Wikipedia says of the composition of the lower atmosphere: Because methane condenses out of Titan's atmosphere at high altitudes, its abundance increases as one descends below the tropopause at an altitude of 32 km, leveling off at a value of 4.9% [the rest is mostly nitrogen] between 8 km and the surface. and in a separate article The average ...


6

No, liquid methane in a nitrogen atmosphere is not a useful fuel. Earth is a very special place to have such a reactive substance as oxygen abundantly in the atmosphere, and that's only because plants are constantly generating it from carbon dioxide using solar power. Without some process like that, any combination of chemicals that you could burn to make ...


6

Given that they are finding water in all sorts of places, my bet is on Enceladus and Mars. But here's a few interesting quotes I gathered from NASA... From Water: Life's Elixir in the Solar System: Liquid water is a necessity for every form of life known, with the possible exception of some plants or fungi that may get by on water vapor. With this ...


6

As noted before, landing gear, especially for soft or relatively rough surfaces, tends to be heavy, and mass is at a premium. More on that later. But there is another good reason to stay aloft, especially if the craft can fly at more than ~12 m/s, which is Titan's equatorial rotation speed (11.744 m/s): you can stay on the Earth-facing side of Titan, so you ...


5

I think we should break this down in two parts: Operation at low temperature and impact of a "hot" rover on the environment. Most semi-conductor based electronics as we have them today don't have an inherent problem operating at very low temperatures. The characteristics of e.g. diodes and transistors depend a lot on temperature, which plays an important ...


4

******************************************************************************* Revised: Jan 12, 2005 Cassini Huygens Probe -150 http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/instruments-huygens.cfm The 318-kilogram (701-pound) Huygens probe separated from the ...


4

The RTG will be part of the helicopter. The helicopter will weigh 420 kg (early estimate). Dragonfly will be a helicopter-only mission, there's no ground station. This is the landing configuration, you can see the helicopter is the only object inside the aeroshell, i.e. the only object that will land.


3

Depending on your environmental suit, it would probably be much like the Apollo astronauts' mode of choice on the moon. I say "depending on your environmental suit" because the environment at Titan is very different from that on the moon. True, the gravitational acceleration is roughly the same, but a Titan environmental suit wouldn't have to protect ...


3

The limit is probably when protein folding and other chemical reactions change due to pressure. We can up the pressure a LOT, as we are filled with non-compressible fluids, then and force our human to breath an oxygenated liquid ... but at some point the human wouldn't function on a cellular level due to pressure affecting our functions. https://www.nature....


2

Titan also has more of the right stuff to work with, in order to make an atmosphere. Remember our own, massive (by comparison) Earth did not come with an atmosphere; it outgassed as it cooled. Our Moon, if formed by a collision, had its volatile matter escape between the time of the collision and its re-formation into a massive body, whereas Titan retained ...


1

You could, but you would probably have to import oxygen or hydrogen peroxide from the Saturn moon Rhea.


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