15

Soyuz 10 used the launch escape tower from the pad.


11

You'll have to define 'pad abort' as you are talking about both Apollo, Soyuz and the Space Shuttle. Apollo/Soyuz and Space Shuttle are vastly different vehicles, hence they have vastly different definitions of aborts. There were five RSLS (Redundant Set Launch Sequencer) aborts during the STS programme (on STS-41-D, STS-51, STS-51-F, STS-55 and STS-68). ...


5

I can't find any performance specifications for Dream Chaser; apparently it uses its orbital maneuvering rockets for powered abort, which I would not expect to be very high acceleration. Body lift would maybe help pull it out of the booster's flight line? CST-100 is also hard to find specs for, but it looks like it's using 4 220kN RS-88 Bantam engines in ...


5

No. Dragon V2 will likely be the first capsule with a built in "pusher" LES, an array of SuperDraco engines. The reason it has never been done is because the LES is usually considered dead weight once the craft has reached orbit. Jettisoning the LES as early as possible saves payload mass. The reason SpaceX and Dragon keep it is twofold. Falcon 9 v1.1 is ...


4

According to NASASpaceflight.com article from December 4, 2013, yes: Another element that will heading uphill on EFT-1 will be an inert Launch Abort System (LAS). Most of the LAS won’t be active for the flight – not least because there will be no humans on board the Orion. However, the jettison motor will be active, allowing for a separation ...


3

Looks like these are the first (according to http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19239-whats-the-best-way-to-eject-astronauts-during-liftoff.html). I believe Elon indicated it had never been done before in his D2 reveal. Saying something has never been done before is a bit difficult to prove.


2

The proposed, but never completed and flown, Gemini B spacecraft might have used its solid-fuel retrorocket package, normally used for de-orbiting the spacecraft, for early launch aborts. The NASA Gemini flights launched on a Titan II, using only hypergolic liquid fuels, which can't explode quite as dramatically as non-hypergolics or solids, so ejection ...


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