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It's using the gravity of Venus alone. Skimming the atmosphere would risk damaging the spacecraft From the NASA blog On Oct. 3, Parker Solar Probe successfully completed its flyby of Venus at a distance of about 1,500 miles during the first Venus gravity assist of the mission. These gravity assists will help the spacecraft tighten its orbit closer and ...


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The telescope was placed into a heliocentric orbit when its helium supply was depleted On 29 April 2013, ESA announced that Herschel's supply of liquid helium, used to cool the instruments and detectors on board, had been depleted, thus ending its mission. At the time of the announcement, Herschel was approximately 1.5 million km from Earth. Because ...


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@Machavity's answer is correct. This is just some addition, interesting data. I had downloaded the data for Parker Solar Probe from Horizons before the launch. They had state vectors for a complete (planned) mission there (Revised: Aug 24, 2018) from launch until 2025-Aug-31 09:19:00. Currently Horizons is showing a much shorter span because it is now based ...


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Is it possible to combine both approaches to perform flybys to the outer planets and escape the solar system?? Launch it first as if it was a Venus mission which heavily relies on oberth trickery, then use Venus and Earth gravity assists to reach Jupiter, and from there beyond Basically yes. If your main concern is to get to the outer solar system or onto a ...


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Apollo 11 first entered a 103 nautical mile orbit, and midway through orbit 2 was boosted onto lunar trajectory. This was 2hrs 50mins into the mission, so from this point onwards, mission control were not considering orbits of the Earth. Apollo 11 passed 22k nautical miles at 5hrs and 22 minutes into the mission. 2:54 p.m.- The spacecraft is reported 22,...


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