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1

I got a book from 1963, "Wie funktioniert das?", how things work: Translation: Treibdampf high pressure steam inlet Kühlwasser cooling water inlet Auspuff exhaust pipe Saugstuzen pump inlet side Vakuum ...


0

The Arnold Air Force (AEDC) base at Tullahoma Tn has major altitude rocket firing test cells. Witnessed Apollo Service Module firing tests there in the mid 60s. That engine was around 25k lbf. It had an expansion ratio of 62.5. I believe the capabilities of that facility have expanded greatly to larger engines since then. Seem to recall an altitude firing ...


8

There are several test stands with altitude capability of up to 100 K ft (30.5 km or 8 Torr) for engine firings using the steam ejector system and up to 250 K ft (76 km) non-firing capability with vacuum pumps. 8 Torr is 1 kPa or about one hundredth of the sea level air pressure. The NASA White Sands Test Facility Propulsion Test Stands and the Glenn ...


14

Flow separation can occur in a rocket nozzle that is overexpanded. This can cause quite severe turbulence and thus buffeting of the rocket nozzle. The SSME used a special rocket nozzle shape to partially compensate for this. Apparently, the Raptor just bulls its way past the problem by virtue of very high chamber pressure (Meaning the nozzle is not so very ...


-8

There is no reason they would disintegrate. The main (only!) difference between them is the length of the nozzle (the vacuum one is a bit longer). A vacuum engine will run just fine in the atmosphere, albeit a little bit less efficiently


16

The ISS Utility Transfer Assemblies (UTAs) are located in the center of the Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJs) - the continuously rotating interface between the outer truss segments that support the solar arrays, and the inner truss segments that support the pressurized modules. The UTAs contain the roll rings. Here is a picture of one of the roll rings. ...


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