Hot answers tagged

35

The Venus flyby does indeed make the mission shorter, but it has some pretty serious negative consequences as well. The mission spends much more time in deep space. Approaching the sun will increase the amount of radiation exposure by a large amount. The thermal design would need to be rethought to survive that close to the Sun. The time on Mars for a Venus ...


32

Can't speak to the trajectory aspects but the Orbiter crew compartment was very intolerant of crush pressure loading. The two negative pressure relief valves protect the crew compartment from being crushed if ambient pressure rises above the pressure in the cabin. These negative pressure relief valves will crack when ambient pressure is 0.2 psid greater ...


19

It's the third in a series. Planet-A, "Suiseu" studied Halley's comet. Planet-B, "Nozomi" visited Mars. Looks like there's a Planet-D (PDF link) planned for visiting Venus, too.


16

Due to thermodynamics, the temperature must increase. Heat flows from hot to cold, and can not go the other direction. If there is a cold pocket between the (hot) core and the (hot) atmosphere of Venus, heat will flow into it. For it to remain cold, this heat would have to be dumped elsewhere, but since there's no colder place nearby for it to leak heat, it ...


10

An ISAS mission in development is known by a series and a letter. After successful launch, it gets a name, based on suggestions from its developers. One I worked on, ASTRO-E, unsuccessfully launched, was rebuilt as ASTRO-E2. Once successfully launched, it was named "Suzaku", after a mythical bird that is reborn in some stories.


10

In very rough terms, based on data from Wikipedia and NASA sites An empty SpaceShuttle is around 165 000 pounds, and has volume roughly Height, 56.1 m (184 ft 1 in). Diameter, 8.7 m (28 ft 7 in). So, a density of about 22.5 kg/m^3, while Venus' atmosphere at ground level is 67 kg/m^3, so the Shuttle would float 'way up there somewhere around 15 km ...


9

There's a lot in here, but let me get the major things. Landing on Venus is pretty much impossible for humans with current technology. Mars is much easier, we can do that, Venus would be extraordinarily difficult, to say the least. There are at least 4 missions with some US backing that are proposed and under active funding. Rocket Lab's private Venus ...


8

technically it was fiberglass with acrylic fibers - "стеклонитрон"("glass-nitron"). It was necessary to get down through the hot atmosphere quickly, but not hit the surface too hard. To accomplish this, the main parachute was reefed, a cord wrapped around the parachute cables held the mouth of the chute closed like a goblet, and the ...


7

Geoffrey Landis certainly seemed to think that floating habitats in Venus' atmosphere were possible... if you've not already done so, have a read of Colonization of Venus (only 6 pages!) for a brief summary of his thoughts on the matter. Venusian clouds have sulphuric acid and more than 96 % Carbon dioxide. Does this ensures a constant supply of oxygen, ...


6

There are some very different concerns here, but I think I can address a couple of them: First, why was it necessary for the Russians to land at local Noon on those days? Noon is the time of day were the least amount of atmosphere is blocking the Sun. One of the findings of Venera 8, which did not land at noon, was that there is sufficient light on the ...


5

tl;dr: For a spacecraft orbiting the Earth within the 1.5 million kilometer Hill sphere, there will be plenty of opportunities to view a transit of Venus. Below I've done the calculation for central transits but it's not exhaustive; from the edge of the Hill sphere there will be even more transits across the edges of the Sun. If I get time in the next few ...


5

Using JPL's Solar System Dynamics HORIZONS Web-Interface (DE-441 ephemeris) to find the positions (w.r.t. the solar system barycenter, SSB*) of the Earth, Venus, and the Sun from today (10-June-2021) until 12-Dec-2117 (the next transit is 11-Dec-2117, 1 day time steps): *(future me realizes it's probably easier to configure the planet's positions w.r.t. the ...


5

Here's an interesting paper that touches on this from the John Glenn Research Center. It appears that it is possible to use RTG technology to move, power, and cool the electronics but it's not efficient. The electronics would still be operating at their maximum rated temperatures.


4

As this article says, the silicon carbide integrated circuits were demonstrated to work stably in the range of 1000 °C and for more than 100 hours under 800 °C temperature without changing the signal or supply voltage. While diffusion in the material happened and affected the characteristics of the device, it stabilized after this initial burn-in. The main ...


3

#22 - explosive bolt for opening the top cover As you can see in the diagram, the explosive bolt (#22) is in a comfortable environment inside the capsule, protected by thermal insulation (#11). https://epizodyspace.ru/01/2u/solnthe/ams/v-8/v-8.html


3

A habitat floating in the atmosphere of Venus is certainly an interesting concept and does have a lot going for it, but it also has problems. hydrogen and water would be in short supply as there is not that much in the atmosphere. A Venus flyer would also be blown on high speed winds around the planet which would make rendezvous with supply ships a bit ...


3

Almost none, to be honest, using the method you propose. SLS can carry approximately 6 tons to Jupiter using a direct route (Based on Europa Clipper). To then land, cut, and re-launch would lead to a very small amount of ice actually carried to Venus. Not sure of the amount exactly, because it depends on the exact way one makes the spacecraft, but I'm going ...


3

Interesting idea, and I don't see why it won't work. It'll probably even take less energy as you wouldn't need a heater filament. This also relates to something I've wondered recently about the use of SSTV to transmit images from the surface of Venus. SSTV, once demodulated is a relatively simple analog signal using three audible frequencies (representing ...


3

Nanomechanical computers are much more energy efficient then electric microchips. They can deal with a lot of electromagnetic noise, and really big temperature differences. Their memory is more resistant, and they are compact. They have a lower clock rate, but because they release a small fraction of electric computers, they can outperform electric computers ...


2

It's going to be a very rough landing. I'm going to handwave the descent and approach phases, and focus on the landing. The Shuttle Landing Facility is a runway 4600 m long, 91 m wide, and 40 cm thick. The Space Shuttle needed most to all of the runway for landings, even with drag chutes. This Venus Shuttle would require a similar prepared runway for ...


2

I would like to counter the naysayers. As long as we're dreaming of terraforming, this seems as good an idea as any. First, I think there's a bit too much hand-waving along the lines of, "Well, once we could do that, we might as well... do... something... else??" That begs the question, "What else?" Two counter-suggestions, namely, using ...


2

From the article New: Hot Map of Venus, that I found in this answer: VIRTIS looked through the thick carbon dioxide curtain surrounding Venus and detected the heat directly emitted by the hot rocks on the ground. The instrument made use of the so-called infrared spectral "windows" present in the Venusian atmosphere. Through these windows thermal ...


2

The article Venus nightside surface temperature shows a global map of Venus using Akatsuki infrared measurements. They reveal a hot surface with an average temperature of about 698 K and on a global scale, surface temperatures with a spatial variation of about 230 K ! Fig.1 in that article shows a blue region at 60⁰ N. latitude, that according to Fig. 2 is a ...


2

Let me approach your statement from the comments: with regards for surface mining, it wouldn't be impossible to design mining drones that work on the surface. No. Currently, any continued operation would require continuous use of large amounts of consumables - say, evaporating water - to sustain cooling of such a drone. Sustained operation is outright ...


2

EnVision is a proposed orbiter mission aiming at determining the level and nature of the geological activity and the sequence of events that generated the surface features of Venus, assessing whether Venus once had oceans (and was thus perhaps hospitable for life) and understanding the geodynamics framework that controls the release of internal heat over ...


2

Let's compare it to a mission that did almost exactly that: The OSIRIS-REx asteroid sampling mission. OSIRIS-REx flew from Earth to a destination closer than any of the possible icy moons or asteroids, but with luck we might locate a suitable ice-bearing target that is as easy to reach. Definitely there are none that are easier, and most are much further ...


1

As it is closer to the sun, it receives 4 to 5 times the sunlight In the "Earthlike" regions of the atmosphere, Venus gets only a fraction of the sunlight available in orbit due to clouds and haze. Worse, you must construct every square meter of real estate you want to place solar panels on, you can't just lay them out in a handy open area. Also, ...


1

You don't start with a departure date--that's one of the answers, not one of the inputs. I don't know a formula for calculating a gravity assist orbit so I will use the easy case and omit Venus, as well as assuming the planets are in circular, coplanar orbits: Find the orbital period of the transfer orbit. For our simple case the orbital radius is (mercury ...


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