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As this article says, the silicon carbide integrated circuits were demonstrated to work stably in the range of 1000 °C and for more than 100 hours under 800 °C temperature without changing the signal or supply voltage. While diffusion in the material happened and affected the characteristics of the device, it stabilized after this initial burn-in. The main ...


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Interesting idea, and I don't see why it won't work. It'll probably even take less energy as you wouldn't need a heater filament. This also relates to something I've wondered recently about the use of SSTV to transmit images from the surface of Venus. SSTV, once demodulated is a relatively simple analog signal using three audible frequencies (representing ...


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From the article New: Hot Map of Venus, that I found in this answer: VIRTIS looked through the thick carbon dioxide curtain surrounding Venus and detected the heat directly emitted by the hot rocks on the ground. The instrument made use of the so-called infrared spectral "windows" present in the Venusian atmosphere. Through these windows thermal ...


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The article Venus nightside surface temperature shows a global map of Venus using Akatsuki infrared measurements. They reveal a hot surface with an average temperature of about 698 K and on a global scale, surface temperatures with a spatial variation of about 230 K ! Fig.1 in that article shows a blue region at 60⁰ N. latitude, that according to Fig. 2 is a ...


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We don't have proper readings from both, but entropy will tend to level the two out. They aren't always perfectly equal though! The most well known example is that of the seasons on Earth. The peak of summer comes after the solstice because of the ground's absorption of heat. But the relative temperature of the ground and atmosphere is roughly 0. You may ...


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