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It can easily send people to Moon than Mars just because the Moon is closer to the Earth, but the living condition(if they can be called so) is suitable for use on Mars.


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Supplemental answer for parity's sake. I can verify that it wasn't any Apollo-era astronauts Similar to this answer for Mars:


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What makes this somewhat different form the case of Mars is that the orbit of Venus is pretty round. It has even less eccentricity than the orbit of the Earth. Therefore, all "good" close approaches are going to happen close to the perihelion of the Earth. As a first order approximation, that means "good" encounters are somewhere in the ...


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One possibility is that he assumed the atmosphere of Venus contributed about the same elevated temperature as it does on Earth. If one uses his believed albedo value of 49.6 for the Earth and performs the same Stefan-Boltzmann calculation as for Venus, one ends up with a temperature of 236K, 27 degrees lower than for Venus. He may simply have believed (or ...


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$$v_{in} = v_{out}$$ That's the rule when entering a single body system. You are going to leave with exactly as much velocity as you entered with. There are two notable exceptions: More than one body in the system. The flybys of both bodies can very well change how much velocity you leave with. Earth-Moon is such a system. Venus is not. Very small ...


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Is it possible to create a cycler that can travel from Venus to Mars, then back to Venus? Yes. When only two planets are involved, there are several infinite families of cycler orbits. Given the 434 day long orbital period of an ellipse touching both Venus and Mars is almost twice as long as the 225 days orbital period of Venus, it's even possible to ...


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Update: October 2020: It appears this barrier has been crossed with the identification of glycine in the atmosphere of Venus. This link provides an abstract from which the pdf may be downloaded without a paywall. The title, authors and abstract are given below. Detection of simplest amino acid glycine in the atmosphere of the Venus Arijit Manna,1 ...


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We don't need to invoke sulfuric acid or sulfur oxides. Even at relatively low partial pressures and temperatures close to those found on the surface of Venus, carbon dioxide alone can oxidize iron. Thus we need a metal more robust than common steel to avoid being corroded on Venus. See for example Ref. 1, which studies the impact of carbon dioxide on ...


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Recently, I answered this question. I came to know that descent probes also provided some evidence for thin aerosol layers near the surface. It is written that: A recent reanalysis of Venera-13, -14 descent probe spectrophotometer data found a sharp decrease of light levels at 1–2 km altitude, interpreted as indicating a detached layer of aerosols of ...


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TL;DR: Since no one is answering, I am taking take the responsibility. Yes, just like @uhoh said, there are two size modes with mean radii ~0.2 µm (mode 1) and ~1 µm 60 (mode 2), along with a third, controversial mode with radius ~3.5 µm. Long answer The main cloud deck extends from about 48 km up to ∼70 km. It can be subdivided in three layers according to ...


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Summary: The time will depend on how the inside of the spacecraft is insulated, but if we assume that you are in contact with the metal shell of a spacecraft similar to the lunar module (and make a lot of approximations regarding convection in the Venusian atmosphere), you will get serious burns within 15 minutes. The assumptions I make break down as the ...


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The question seems primarily interested in the rate of heat transfer from Venus to the spherical cow spacecraft via conduction and convection types of transfer. That includes both inelastic collisions of atmospheric molecules with the sphere and also adhesion of hot particulates and/or droplets of any aerosol if that happens. The high density of the ...


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As the previous answer says, it might still be too soon for new missions to be planned based on the detection of phosphine published this septembre. However, it might already have an impact on missions that are already flying. Based on this article, BepiColombo and Parker Solar Probe will both be turned towards Venus as they fly by, in an attempt to confirm ...


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What does the discovery of phosphine mean for the future of Venusian exploration? It certainly adds some impetus. However, The discovery has not yet been independently confirmed. This alone is very important. What if the discovery was not a discovery at all? If confirmed, devising a measuring device that can withstand the extremely acidic nature of the ...


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