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28

Here ya go! It includes some other views, but does have the dashcam. As usual though you can't really see the stars. Shuttle mission STS-133


21

It turns out that for the closest that Mars is to Earth, MRO can transmit at 4.0 Megabits/ second on Ka band. That is enough for standard definition video. So something a bit bigger then MRO could easily transmit video, although only when the two planets are close to each other.


20

That's generated by one of the Johnson Space Center robotics/EVA planning tools, called MAGIK (Manipulator Analysis-Graphic, Interactive, Kinematic). Here is a screenshot of a MAGIK video used when we were working on the Docked Late Inspection failure response on STS-131: (personal notes) The small squares are views from different cameras and the large view ...


20

I'll try and find a better picture, but it's the light switch. Labeled GENERAL LIGHTING, buttons ON and OFF Cropped from https://images-assets.nasa.gov/image/s130e007774/s130e007774~orig.jpg The best picture I could find is cropped from https://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/images/recherche/hi-res/7ca21bfc-2a90-4dd9-9e22-a3b13d323a18.jpg I could find no documentation ...


18

tl;dr: There's certainly some propagation of sound waves possible at 100 km altitude. With a density a million times lower than at the surface the mean free path of individual molecules will approach a millimeter, so ultrasonics might be impacted, but for Human or GoPro frequencies it will be much quieter, but still there. Till what altitude above earth ...


18

When in doubt for such things, http://archive.org. https://archive.org/details/youtube-Y70SgYPIBGY Or if you prefer on YouTube


16

The live broadcasts from the Moon were not recorded on the LEM/CM. Video tape recorders were too large at the time to make this practical. They usually came in the shape of an open-reel tape recorder with 2" wide tape. This is the Ampex VR-660, a "portable" VTR that weighed 50 kg: NASA used the VR-660 at ground stations to store slow-scan video. The ...


15

The title of the question asks Till what altitude above earth sounds can be heard? @uhoh gave a detailed answer to that question. I'll instead speculatively answer an implied question in the body of the OP, What is the sound in the linked video? The OP implicitly assumes the sounds in the video were transmitted through the air to a microphone. (Many ...


13

It depends on what you consider a "video". Since space probes only take photos, "videos" can be achieved by stitching multiple frames, but then those videos are usually low FPS. Since your title isn't limited to rovers, here are some examples: Descent of Curiosity on Mars: Descent of Huygens on Titan: ...


9

Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space. There was a real-time TV transmission from his spacecraft, the 'Vostok'. Some fragments here: edit by Hobbes: added screenshot of the in-flight video:


8

For example, this answer shows the math behind the Voyagers being noise limited with a ~1 kHz bandwidth at 20 billion kilometers. At 100 million km, a Voyager sized antenna with a few Watts would make a signal at earth 46 dB stronger, so you would be noise-limited around (40 MHz) with the 70m dish and receiver with a NEP of 20 Kelvin. These are handwavingly ...


7

Hobbes' answer is correct, but here is some supplemental information. The Erectable S-Band Antenna was a parabolic dish that was folded and stowed in the descent stage. Page 4-86 of the Apollo Program Summary Report describes the diameter as 10 feet and this NASA webpage says 3 meters. It was carried on Apollo 11-14. Although the LM could broadcast with ...


6

According to https://www.kik-sssr.ru/Duplex_Fobos.htm Двухсторонняя телевизионная связь впервые была установлена с бортом ОПС "Салют-6". Космонавты Ляхов и Рюмин (3-я основная экспедиция, 8-я стыковка пилотируемых КК); прибывшие на "Союзе-32" (старт 25 февраля 1979 года), смонтировали ТВ-аппаратуру, присланную на "Прогрессе-5" (запущен 12-го и ...


5

Unless and until we get some official communication from SpaceX and/or Elon Musk, there is unfortunately no way to answer this question definitively. However, as with most things SpaceX, there is a community of enthusiasts that are spotting various changes to the various vehicles involved, and their observations allow us some educated guesses. Most notably, ...


5

I sincerely doubt this is "dust" of any kind. It looks and behaves like the classic sensor noise that is visible any time an image sensor is used at high gain. Noise in this case is typically described as random fluctuations in the voltage levels recorded by the image sensing system caused by factors such as local heat and variations between sensor pixels. ...


5

Ok, it appears they are now using the EHDC, a different camera that doesn't always have availability, to provide a live video feed. It would be great to get access to additional feeds though. https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/ESRS/HDEV/


5

I think this is it. It's part of a fabulous 6 Part series on Apollo called Moon Machines. Other parts covered the computer, the lunar module etc. I think this series is the best documentary I've seen about Apollo.


5

As far as I know, only NASA (since you asked for the agency) through its High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) Experiment gives the live coverage of the Earth from the ISS. It might not be up for all the time and they sometimes switch to previously recorded videos in case of technical problems but this is only source I know available in the public domain. ...


4

Worth mentioning that it takes 3 to 22 minutes for light to reach one of these planets from the other. And no transmission can exceed light speed, barring a huge overhaul of Physics as we know it. No equipment ever could have the signal here in less than three minutes. Any affirmative answers are using a definition of "live" that allows for minutes-...


3

You can get some information from SpaceX's FCC filings for "Special Temporary Authority". There aren't always individual ones for specific launches, because certain approvals cover larger times, and they're a little broken up. For example, 0551-EX-ST-2019 covers transmissions from the first and second stages during flight, while the more-recent 2181-EX-ST-...


3

The video and audio were not packaged in the same file: InSight did not produce a video file with audio tracks. As you can see in the screenshot, the 'audio' was recorded by the seismometer instrument (SEIS) as vibration data. This can be converted to audio (after all, audio is also vibration data), but this was done after reception. NASA did some ...


3

One such launcher would be the good old Soyuz launcher. I think this onboard launch video looks particularly nice. Given the low cost and weight of video cameras these days, I would expect most launch vehicles to have several. Whether this footage is easily available or not is a different problem.


3

All raw images from both Perseverance and Ingenuity are here: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/


2

The longest timelapse of a Martian moon I'm aware of is this 27 minute long timelapse of Phobos rising at June 28, 2013. The light conditions, and the relatively small size of Phobos in the sky, makes the effect hard to see. Phobos goes from horizon to horizon in approximately 4 hours 15 minutes, so this timelapse should ...


2

According to your linked document the video signal from the vidicon (in record mode) The composite video resulting from vidicon readout is applied through the emitter follower to the modulator and produces frequency variations in the 85-kc subcarrier oscillator. This FM signal is then applied through the head driver to the video record head of the tape ...


2

From astronautix Payload: Two 6 W transponders with 50 MHz bandwidth. No multiple access. 240 voice circuits or one TV channel. Required bandwidth for one TV channel of this time was about 5 MHz. Therefore the TV signal was not AM modulated, FM was used for noise reduction. The electronics of such an early communication satellite had to be small, ...


2

I'm not entirely sure it's the video I remember seeing in museums, but if it isn't, it's definitely close enough for jazz: It's called "Seventeen Seconds of Fuel Remained," and it appears to be an official NASA video (if so, then it's Public Domain by definition), and I found something that could give it to me as an MP4 file. ...


2

There is a fifteen minute video of the descent from lunar orbit to the surface here: Apollo 11 landing from PDI to Touchdown And a full list of the Apollo 11 movie footage at the Apollo 11 Flight Journal site


1

There is this collection of videos on the NSS's YouTube channel, taken by attendees. They search for such uploaded videos and make them more accessible this way. Right now there are about 150 such videos. However even that is only a smattering of the talks that occurred. ISDCs are huge events, I'd estimate the 25 videos of the most recent one represents ...


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