Nuclear Hoagie
  • Member for 5 years, 10 months
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Can an asteroid enter Earth orbit?
2 votes

Very unlikely. One interesting thing about orbital trajectories is that they are reversible in time. You can watch a rocket take off from earth and enter orbit, and if you want to know how to land it, ...

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Can we land on an asteroid and ride on it?
11 votes

If the asteroid is moving at a "much higher speed than our spacecraft", then the spacecraft will either: never catch up to it, or be destroyed when they collide at a high rate of speed. ...

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Would an astronaut experience a force during a gravity assist maneuver?
13 votes

The astronaut will be accelerated by the gravitational pull of the body they are passing, but they won't "feel" it in a qualitative sense like they do during an engine burn. This is because ...

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How fast is fuel escaping a rocket for it to reach the escape velocity 11 km/s?
5 votes

Consider a rocket floating motionless in space. You'd like to start moving, so you throw some mass out the back in the form of exhaust, which accelerates your craft in the opposite direction. The ...

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How is the space probe powered to travel a huge distance in a deep space mission?
4 votes

Other answers have already mentioned the types of thrust that a space probe can use to increase/decrease velocity, or to adjust course. I'll mention one other source of velocity that allows space ...

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Why is it easier to escape the solar system than get to Mercury or the Sun?
34 votes

Changing orbits requires delta-v. To reach the Sun, you need to subtract delta-v such that your velocity relative to the Sun is near zero, which allows you to "fall straight down" into the ...

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Why is it most efficient to change orbit inclination while crossing the equator?
8 votes

It's not just the most efficient way, it's the only way to achieve this particular target orbit. As the other answers have pointed out, an orbital inclination change must occur at the so-called ...

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How does time work on other planets?
4 votes

Regarding "Is there any way of knowing what time is on other planet?", you could of course keep track of local time at a specific place on another planet. Similar to how a news room might have clocks ...

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Why aren't rockets launched in movement?
4 votes

Launching a rocket from a hole will make the problem harder, not easier. You'll have the exact same acceleration/velocity profile, except your altitude will be a few hundred meters below where it ...

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How many stages needed for a launch ? How to plan a launch
2 votes

This will be highly dependent on the characteristics of your fuel tanks, engines, and payload. A rocket uses stages because it's a good way to drop weight that's no longer needed, most notably, empty ...

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Could a fan be used to prevent overheating on a Venus bound space probe?
39 votes

Fans work by moving cool air (or other fluid) over a warm surface. If there is no air, like in space, a fan will serve no purpose. Cooling things in space is actually a bit tricky because of this - ...

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Could we wait for Mars to come to us?
7 votes

There is no "stopping" in space - no matter how far you are from other celestial bodies, the force of gravity will always be tugging on you, pulling you in some direction. Within the Solar System, ...

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Did Feynman cite a fallacy about only circles having the same width in all directions as a reason for the Challenger disaster?
Accepted answer
99 votes

This was indeed an avenue of investigation for Feynman. From his autobiographical book What Do You Care What Other People Think?: Then I investigated something we were looking into as a possible ...

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How does the orbit of the Voyager and New Horizons probes manage to get into interstellar space?
Accepted answer
5 votes

This relates to the concept of escape velocity, which is the speed needed to escape an object's gravity well. Even though gravity has an infinite reach, the fact that its force reduces quadratically ...

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How many petaflops does it take to land on the moon? What does Artemis need with an Aitken?
18 votes

All that computing power is not dedicated to the Artemis project. As you quote in the body of your question, The new supercomputer will be used by more than 1,500 scientists and engineers from ...

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Why aren't batteries used in space?
7 votes

Simply put, RTGs last a long time. Space probes need a reliable, long-lasting power source, since we can't just change the batteries when they run out. An RTG can run for decades with relatively ...

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The Loose Astronaut
4 votes

You're right, losing a spacewalk tether by itself isn't an unrecoverable situation. In fact, on a normal spacewalk, anytime the tether isn't taut, it's effectively the same as not having it. With a ...

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