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The date of the "Pale Blue Dot" photo is 14 February 1990, but is its exact time of capture (or at least hour) known?

enter image description here

I was a school child back then, and I am trying to figure out what I was most likely doing at the time the pale blue dot image was taken.

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  • $\begingroup$ JPL's catalog entry for PIA00452 and the related PIA00450 as well as this Wikipedia subsection; "Three of the frames received showed the Earth as a tiny point of light in empty space. Each frame had been taken using a different color filter: blue, green and violet, with exposure times of 0.72, 0.48 and 0.72 seconds respectively. The three frames were then recombined to produce the image that became Pale Blue Dot." $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jan 20 '18 at 0:35
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    $\begingroup$ It will take some detective work to deduce the time of the particular three frames used to generate the color image. Carl Sagan's book Pale Blue Dot just might have the answer also. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jan 20 '18 at 0:37
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    $\begingroup$ I've pursued this trail as far as reviewing the datasets online at JPL, but I haven't been able to find the actual raw image data in a collection yet. Based on their categorization, I think it's possible this Family Portrait series is in a different dataset, perhaps one of the unsorted ones at the bottom. I'm still unclear if the file times in the archives are relevant to capture time, or merely some processing/archiving date. pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/volumes/voyager.html $\endgroup$ – Saiboogu Jan 23 '18 at 23:02
  • $\begingroup$ Other answers related to this image here and here. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jan 24 '18 at 9:44
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As far as I know, the raw data used to make the Pale Blue Dot image have not been preserved in NASA's Planetary Data System, which is why other commenters can't find it online. You might try contacting someone at the PDS Rings Node to see if anybody there has the data and metadata.

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