Linked Questions

31
votes
2answers
4k views

Which LEO satellite lost over 30 km of altitude in the geomagnetic storm of 13-14 March 1989?

This answer includes the following information: During the great geomagnetic storm of 13-14 March 1989, tracking of thousands of space objects was lost and it took North American Defense Command (...
46
votes
1answer
34k views

How often does ISS require re-boosting to higher orbit?

I know that ISS, being in low Earth orbit, requires regular boosts. But I can't seem to find information on how often does this happen. Is it done during each resupply mission, only during some of ...
15
votes
2answers
5k views

What is the ISS drag?

ISS constantly loses altitude to air drag and other forces (tidal, electromagnetic). While finding that rate in the sources isn't that hard, with orbital mechanics of altitude loss actually increasing ...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

How do orbital boosts affect the structural integrity of the ISS?

I've become curious of this question since my time on KSP, and searches have not rendered much. In the simulator, building large stations even without the micro atmosphere being simulated, can cause ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the density of the earth's atmosphere at an altitude of four hundred kilometers?

What is the density of the earth's atmosphere at an altitude of four hundred kilometers? I want to use it to calculate the drag on something in orbit near the ISS. The Jacchia Reference Atmosphere is ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

This ISS trash deployment looks more like 2 feet than 2 inches per second, was it too fast or are these articles incorrect?

Digital Trends' Watch a NASA astronaut jettison part of the ISS into space which was linked in says: Writing in Air & Space last year about the process of jettisoning objects, veteran NASA ...
15
votes
1answer
521 views

How precisely do we know mass of the ISS?

Everyone knows that in space, every gram counts. Knowing how much mass an orbital object has is necessary for precise motion calculations. So how precisely do we know the mass of ISS? I'm sure we can ...
10
votes
2answers
749 views

Does any site track the mass of the ISS?

Watching the daily ISS live broadcast from NASA the PRO mentioned the specific mass of the ISS complex (today) and what it would be when the Soyuz leaves shortly. One can find out the mass of each ...
11
votes
3answers
514 views

How steady is the atmospheric drag force experienced by the ISS?

Suppose one wanted to modulate the power of a hypothetical, powerful ion thruster on the ISS to continuously compensate the atmospheric drag force in order to achieve near-perfect free-fall conditions ...
11
votes
1answer
966 views

What is the orbital boost acceleration of the ISS?

How much acceleration does the International Space Station experience during its orbital adjustment boosts? How much thrust and for how long? Bonus question: what is the highest acceleration that the ...
10
votes
2answers
478 views

Garbage powered reboosting module for low Earth orbiting space stations

Instead of dumping massive garbage packs once in a while, using a robotic arm, could some sort of garbage canon eject the same mass in small pieces, at higher velocity, so that it contributes to ...
9
votes
1answer
774 views

How are the orientations of the ISS' eight independent solar arrays optimized?

I've noticed that in various photos and videos the orientation of the ISS' eight independent solar arrays are often moving, and usually some are different than others. 0th-order naive thinking would ...
6
votes
3answers
356 views

How much of a drag is it, orbiting the Earth in a space suit?

An astronaut in a spacesuit travels around the Earth at the same altitude as the ISS. Let's say the astronaut leads the ISS by 1000 meters along the same orbit. After one orbit, how much velocity has ...
3
votes
0answers
59 views

ISS Mass breakdown [duplicate]

I'm looking for some solid numbers that break down the mass of the ISS into functional categories (with the goal of making a neat pie chart). Such categories might include the mass of... Docked ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

What are the limitations to using this “trick” to quantitatively relate altitude changes (via their speed) with applied forces that cause them?

In this comment I used a "trick" to double check a calculation in the post above it. Using the vis-viva equation I first determined that if the ISS lost 10 meters of altitude in 86400 ...